• Creativity and Democracy in Education: Practices and politics of learning through the arts

      Adams, Jeff; Owens, Allan; University of Chester (Routledge, 2015-07-16)
      With particular reference to the practices and politics of learning through the arts this book (Research Monograph) forms part of the Routledge Research in Education Policy and Politics series aims to enhance our understanding of key challenges and facilitate on-going academic debate within the influential and growing field of Education Policy and Politics.
    • Culture, Politics and Drama Education: The Creative Agenda 1997-2015

      Piasecka, Shelley; University of Chester (National Drama Publications, 2016-04-30)
      In the years following New Labour’s election victory (1997) the creative agenda was a visible concern for schools and teachers. A number of influential documents and policy documents were launched to promote creativity in schools. New funding opportunities had been made available to support teachers and classroom learning, most notably the Arts Council initiative Creative Partnerships (2002). Buckingham and Jones (2001) describe the period as the “Cultural Turn” towards the creative and cultural industries. Paradoxically, the creative agenda emerged at a time when teachers experienced unprecedented levels of control over, and public scrutiny of, their everyday working lives; it was a period of time dominated by a ‘bureaucratisation” of education. For Stronach et al. (2002) it was a rise of a performativity discourse in response to the audit culture. Post 2010, the introduction of school performance measures, such as the compulsory English Baccalaureate (2015), offers another kind of performativity discourse, but from a perspective other than creativity. The long-term outlook for creative subjects appears bleak, particularly for dance and drama. This article examines the period 1997-2015 with reference to Neelands and Choe’s (2010) assertion that creativity is a cultural and political idea.
    • Turning to Learning: Organising Reflection and Creating Space for Reflexive Practices via Arts Based Initiatives

      Passila, A.; Owens, Allan; Sproedt, Henrik; University of Lapeenranta, University of Chester (2015-07-02)
      The purpose of this study is concerned with ‘inclusive growth’ (Europe2020) in the sense of having a clear agenda to develop new skills and jobs as well as new skills for new jobs. We draw on research into conceptualisations of new leadership and management such as Eraut, M. (2000) Non-formal learning and tacit knowledge in professional work. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 70, pp. 113–136; Raelin, J. (2004) Don't bother putting leadership into people. Academy of Management Perspectives August 1, vol. 18 no. 3 pp.131-135; Raelin, J. (2007) Academy of Management Perspectives December 1, 2007 vol. 6 no. 4 pp. 495-519. Our contribution is to discuss innovation potential through the idea of creating a broader participatory orientation where employees, managers, stakeholders, customers/end users and scholar’s needs, expertise and views can be utilized to develop new practices and ways of organizing reflection (Vince 2002; Pässilä & Vince, forthcoming; Vince & Reynolds 2009) and creating space for reflexive practices (Antonacopoulou 2004; Cotter 2014; Pässilä et. al 2013).