• A motivation to move: Juxtaposing the embodied practices of Pina Bausch and Ingemar Lindh

      Bugeja, Nicola; University of Chester (Routledge, 2015-03-26)
      In their summer newsletter of 1996, the Centre for Performance Research (CPR) announced a workshop retreat to be led by Swedish theatre practitioner Ingemar Lindh at Druidstone in West Wales. The workshop, which was supposed to run in July of 1997, did not happen due to Lindh’s untimely death in Malta a few days before. The announcement described Lindh’s work as ‘oscillating between sensuality, even eroticism, on the one hand, and a kind of choreography of everyday life, similar sometimes to the work of Pina Bausch, on the other’ (CPR 1996, p. 9). Taking the CPR comparison as its cue, this article investigates an overlapping concern between the tanztheater practice of Bausch and the laboratory theatre work of Lindh: that whether called ‘movement’ or ‘action’, a performer’s work needs to be motivated by one’s personal input (memories, thoughts, images, and other mental processes) rather than executed as an estranged and dictated vocabulary of movement. This premise was largely a result of two major influential figures in Bausch’s and Lindh’s careers: Rudolph von Laban and Étienne Decroux. The article starts with a concise contextualisation of a reaction to rigid methodology in both tanztheater and laboratory theatre, i.e. Bausch’s and Lindh’s backgrounds respectively. It then juxtaposes Laban’s and Decroux’s reflections on embodied practice, leading the way to a discussion of the matter in the practices of Bausch and Lindh. To achieve broader understanding, the juxtaposition is supported by a close reading of Rick Kemp’s (2012) and Erika Fischer-Lichte’s (2008) accounts of ‘embodied mind’.
    • Creativity and Democracy in Education: Practices and politics of learning through the arts

      Adams, Jeff; Owens, Allan; University of Chester (Routledge, 2015-07-16)
      With particular reference to the practices and politics of learning through the arts this book (Research Monograph) forms part of the Routledge Research in Education Policy and Politics series aims to enhance our understanding of key challenges and facilitate on-going academic debate within the influential and growing field of Education Policy and Politics.
    • Diving Into the Wild: Ecologies of Performance in Devon and Cornwall

      Sarco-Thomas, Malaika; Falmouth University (Routledge, 2015-03-31)
      This chapter explores different examples of site-based dance performance in Devon and Cornwall, analysing them for the different ways they invite audiences and performers to engage with nature. The essay maps a continuum for engaging with the outdoors via a table that categorises different sited dance activities and performances from 2001-2014, drawing on findings of reports which identify the health benefits of engaging with green spaces. Works are analysed for their ways of encouraging viewing nature, incidental involvement, and purposeful, somatic involvement with the outdoors. The chapter argues that such performance initiatives offer conceptual and social frameworks for outdoor experiences that provide individuals with health-giving benefits whilst simultaneously proposing ways to think differently about our relationships to wild places.
    • Drive, Speed and Narrative in the Soundscapes of Racing Games

      Collins, Karen; Dockwray, Ruth; University of Waterloo; University of Chester (Routledge, 2017-06-01)
      This chapter argues that racing games are situated in a space between reality and fantasy: a cinematic realism, or “cine-real". At the heart of the auditory cine-realism is a use of sound and music to both fill a gap left by the lack of sensory information presented to the player, and as part of a narrative device. The authors also argue that the narrative use of music and sound in racing games is one of the key features that distinguishes racing games from straight simulations.
    • Let’s Do the Time Warp Again: Performing Time, Genre, and Spectatorship

      Ellis, Sarah T.; University of Chester (Routledge, 2019-07-01)
      "Let's Do the Time Warp Again: Performing Time, Genre, and Spectatorship" identifies an affective link across nonrealist, time-warping genres of science fiction / fantasy and musical theater, as well as their dedicated and overlapping fan cultures; by considering reality to be historical and contingent, these anti-quotidian genres explore the limits of what is objectively present, and physicalize a temporally divergent world in the here and now.
    • ‘Proxemic Interaction in Popular Music Recordings’

      Dockwray, Ruth; University of Chester (Routledge, 2017-01-01)
      This paper discusses sonic spatialization and the notion of proxemics in recorded tracks. Spatialization or rather the spatial characteristics and positioning of sounds within a track, can directly influence the way a listener can formulate their own interpretation. Through the analysis of proxemic zones within the context of the ‘sound-box’, their impact in terms of interpersonal distance and listener engagement will be discussed along with potential meanings.
    • Tsalani bwino

      Loudon, Jane; University College Chester (Routledge, 2005)
      This article discusses the author's working relationships with One Hope World and SOS Children's Village in Malawi between 1999-2004.