• Excitable tissues in motion capture practices: The improvising dancer as technogenetic imagist

      Sarco-Thomas, Malaika; Falmouth University (Intellect, 2013-10-01)
      This article outlines the potential of dance improvisation practice to function as a technological interface with one’s environment, drawing parallels between the performances of Twig Dances (Sarco-Thomas 2010) and technologies used in the life sciences to map living matter onto still frames. A postphenomenological approach is used to compare improvisation scores with image-making technologies. Scores that invite corporeal responses to the non-human, and kinaesthetic responses to organic matter, are highlighted as technologies which stand further exploration and examination as they mediate our experience of the world. A diversifying field of somatic practices is proposed as a means to investigate the potential knowledges generated by ‘excitable tissues’ enlivened through improvisational practices.
    • What's in a name?

      Harrop, Peter; University of Chester (Intellect, 2005)
      This article takes an impressionistic and loosely comparative overview of British and American Performance Studies provision based on a small sample of university prospectus and website entries as well as conversations with teachers. This material is then examined in the light of recent publication in the field, raising issues of the relationship between Theatre Studies and Performance Studies, writing and embodied knowledge, practice and theory, in an attempt to see what the Performance Studies project might be becoming. It suggests a distinct British conception of Performance Studies, occasionally drawing on the ‘broad spectrum’ North American model while retaining active curricular engagement with the processes of performance making.