• Medium, knowledge, structure: capacities for choice and the contradiction of medium-specificity in games and comics.

      Grennan, Simon; Hague, Ian; University of Chester, London College of Communication (Image [&] Narrative Journal, 2018-03-21)
      Chris Ware’s Building Stories (2012) is a box containing fourteen items that can be read in any order, and for this reason it appears to offer its readers a great deal of choice over the narrative structure of the work. This paper contrasts Building Stories with the video games Fallout: New Vegas and The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim to demonstrate that that although Building Stories does offer choices, these choices are not ultimately meaningful because while the reader can decide the order of presentation, they cannot decide the order of events as they can in the games, and in other examples such as Marc Saporta’s novel Composition No.1. The article draws upon the work of Seymour Chatman, Gonzalo Fresca and Espen Aarseth in analysing narratives in games and texts, and concludes by considering the implications of choice in narrative.
    • Meeting Point

      Grennan, Simon; Sperandio, Christopher; University of Chester; Rice University Houston (Arts & Heritage, 2016-05-01)
      Outputs of an artists' residency at Kirkleatham Museum.
    • Mental pictures: citizen or consumer?

      Rutherford; University of Chester (SAGE, 2008-07-01)
      This journal article discusses media images relating to health care.
    • MerzNorth Seminar 3, 28th October 2015

      Quayle, Cian; University of Chester (The Kurt Schwitters Society, 2015-11)
      Essay/review of the MerzNorth 3 Seminar proceedings for the November 2015 issue of the Kurt Schwitters Society Newsletter. The event was held at the University of Cumbria on the 28th October 2015. The review also includes an account of the author's paper at the seminar related to the preparation of an AHRC funding proposal related to the legacy of Kurt Schwitters internment and exile in Britain during the 1940s.
    • Michael Sandle: Grit in the Oyster and Ideas Never Completed

      Quayle, Cian; University of Chester (Cheshire West and Cheshire Council, 2018-05-18)
      'Grit in the Oyster and Ideas Never Completed' appears in the book publication which accompanies the exhibition 'Michael Sandle - Monumental Rage' at the Grosvenor Museum, May 19 - October 7. The exhibition was curated by Peter Boughton, Keeper of Art at the Grosvenor Museum. The artworks in the exhibition were loaned by the artist and Flowers Gallery, London following their exhibition entitled 'Time, Transition, and Dissent', 22 January - 20 February, 2016. Michael Sandle is one of the leading sculptors of his generation with public artworks on display worldwide. The essay takes the form of an interview based on meetings and correspondence with Sandle, which focus on a collection of the artist's sketchbooks from 1965 onwards. Sandle's work is rooted in drawing as a medium as he continually works through ideas for sculpture, which are not completed in the sense that the themes and concerns, which the work addresses thematically, are unresolved in relation to their subject and content. The sketchbooks reveal the development of thoughts and ideas for artworks and their relationship with time, place, dream and memory. These ideas are continually reformulated in drawings and etchings, which are then made manifest in site-specific works of sculpture. The essay references significant events and influential works by other artists, writers and composers which have shaped Sandle's life and work. Sandle's empathy for humanity, and the injustice and catastrophic tragedy of war are also referenced in relation to Walter Benjamin's 'Theses on the Philosophy of History' (1940) via Paul Klee's drawing 'Angelus Novus'.
    • A Mile Apart

      Connolly, Lynne; University of Chester (Lynne Connolly, 2017-10-18)
      Abstract: This paper explores through the use of photography, a parallel mapping of the ‘unspoken’ domestic sphere, the myth of the safety of home, and set against political and external events in a unique period of recent history. It is focused on Belfast, Northern Ireland and the period of ‘The Troubles’. It examines the nature of the space we inhabit, the vernacular, the everyday and how this might influence our identity. Drawing on the work of Bachelard (1969) it will also explore how the vernacular can be located in a different time frame, and therefore allows for a new representation and perspective. The recreation of a wholly new space that partially exists in our experience and further exists in our interpretation of that through memory. It exists in our own parallel universe of understanding wherein we become spectators in the drama of our past. In this research the camera is working in a reversal of representation, using potentially unreliable memory to recreate moments of past events. These moments are often fragments or elements of scenarios. It is not the reliability of memory that is in question but rather the need to have validation of a remembered thing in speaking and visualising of it. Through a series of constructed images, this paper will explore this journey of representation, memory and how the photographic mnemonic becomes a device to explore divergent memories in relation to the home as well as external influences on identity and memory.
    • Misrecognising Misrecognition: the Capacity to Influence in the Milieux of Comics and Fine Art

      Grennan, Simon; University of Chester (University of Amsterdam, 2015-06-15)
      This paper will consider some of the relationships between subjects, social institutions, media and ideas that characterise differences between the environments in which both comics and fine art are produced, used and become comprehensible. It will outline a specific theoretical framework encompassing these differences, describing the discursive co-dependency between forms of media, the uses to which they are put and the habits of thought and expectation engendered by these uses. This encompassing theoretical frame draws in particular upon Althusser, Bourdieu and Hodge and Kress, describing these relationships as ideology, deriving from Karl Mannheim’s and Marx and Engels’ critiques of ideocracy, the promotion of or resistance to ideas on the grounds of the degree to which they reproduce or contradict a dominant social structure. Utilising examples in the productions and social histories of fine artists Jean-Michel Basquiat, Billy Childish, Raymond Peittbon, Lichtenstein and Manet and comics artists Grennan & Sperandio, Janette Parris and Gary Panter, the paper will explore how the relationships between the dominant ideas of one group of people, and the world experiences of other groups, include misrecognition. Those ideas that dominate social discourse in any particular circumstance are not actively misrepresented by the dominant order, according to this model, but rather misrecognised and either overlooked or accepted by others for whom they are materially disadvantageous. Referring to social studies of the fine art world by Zolberg, Danto and Dickie, and to Beaty’s recent commentary on the roles of fan culture, authorlessness and the dynamics of ‘outsider’ status, in creating the social environment of comics, the paper will finally suggest that the degrees and types of this misrecognition constitute two distinct, though continually developing, sets of social constraints that underwrite the possible meanings and uses of comics and fine art, by continually substantiating the histories of their own milieux.
    • Misrecognising Misrecognition: the Capacity to Influence in the Milieux of Comics and Fine Art.

      Grennan, Simon; University of Chester (2016-10-01)
      This paper will consider some of the relationships between subjects, social institutions, media and ideas that characterise differences between the environments in which both comics and fine art are produced, used and become comprehensible. It will outline a specific theoretical framework encompassing these differences, describing the discursive co-dependency between forms of media, the uses to which they are put and the habits of thought and expectation engendered by these uses. This encompassing theoretical frame draws in particular upon Althusser, Bourdieu and Hodge and Kress, describing these relationships as ideology, deriving from Karl Mannheim’s and Marx and Engels’ critiques of ideocracy, the promotion of or resistance to ideas on the grounds of the degree to which they reproduce or contradict a dominant social structure. Utilising examples in the productions and social histories of fine artists Jean-Michel Basquiat, Billy Childish, Raymond Peittbon, Lichtenstein and Manet and comics artists Grennan & Sperandio, Janette Parris and Gary Panter, the paper will explore how the relationships between the dominant ideas of one group of people, and the world experiences of other groups, include misrecognition. Those ideas that dominate social discourse in any particular circumstance are not actively misrepresented by the dominant order, according to this model, but rather misrecognised and either overlooked or accepted by others for whom they are materially disadvantageous. Referring to social studies of the fine art world by Zolberg, Danto and Dickie, and to Beaty’s recent commentary on the roles of fan culture, authorlessness and the dynamics of ‘outsider’ status, in creating the social environment of comics, the paper will finally suggest that the degrees and types of this misrecognition constitute two distinct, though continually developing, sets of social constraints that underwrite the possible meanings and uses of comics and fine art, by continually substantiating the histories of their own milieux.
    • Neither the One nor the Other: Photographic Errors - Subjectivity, Subversion and the In-between

      Piper-Wright, Tracy; University of Chester (MAI, 2018-02-28)
      The photographic error opens up a paradoxical space between machine and human and presents this space as a gap in the conventions of photographic practice both technologically and culturally. By undermining the certainty which attaches to our use of technology the error opens us to the possibility of playing with and against the technology we use, subverting the rules in order to create something new. In the third dimension of the error we are able to question the photographic practices and images which we are surrounded with daily. We can ask what purpose and meaning photography has to us: what are we trying to do when we take a photograph?
    • The New Map of Barset

      Williamson, Michael; Grennan, Simon; University of Chester
      A comprehensive map of the County of Barsetshire, based on Anthony Trollope’s original sketch plan (1860) but incorporating all the references contained within the Barchester and Palliser Series of novels and other references within Trollope’s works.
    • No Sign of Canals on Mars: An artist's response to the illustrated travel diaries of Eileen Burke

      Daly, Tim; University of Chester (Canal & River Trust/ National Waterways Museum, 2018-03-15)
      From 1960 to 1979, Eileen Burke created 23 illustrated travel diaries with her friend Flo Boyde while touring in their car and cruising the River Lee and the River Stort with their boat, the 'Lillian Maud'. The diaries are a unique example of leisure as documented by a keen amateur photographer and artist. Inspired by these diaries, Tim Daly, a Senior Lecturer at the University of Chester, has produced a book: "No Sign of Canals on Mars", which includes reproductions of Eileen Burke's watercolours, drawings and excerpts from her diary pages. The exhibition celebrates the 'thingness' of the diaries especially their handmade contents and Eileen's formidable making skills.
    • No Sign of Canals on Mars: The Illustrated Travel Diaries of Eileen Burke

      Daly, Tim; University of Chester (Fugitive Press, 2018-03-15)
      No Sign of Canals on Mars is a multi-part publication containing reproductions of Eileen Burke’s watercolours, drawings and excerpts from her diary pages presented as a spiral bound diary with ephemera inserts and tipped in souvenirs. Alongside this is a small wallet of real photographic prints printed from Eileen’s collection of colour slides. Housed in a museum style clamshell box, the publication aims to be a kind of distributed archive allowing readers to handle and scrutinise works that would otherwise be inaccessible due to their fragile condition.
    • The north as a fantasy playground: The landscape photography of Raymond Moore

      Daly, Tim; University of Chester
      The photographer Raymond Moore (1920-87) who was born in Wallasey, studied painting at the Royal College of Art and in the mid-70s, taught photography at the influential Trent Polytechnic in Nottingham. In 1981, Moore was the first British photographer to have a retrospective at the Hayward Gallery, London. There are two published monographs of his work, Murmurs at Every Turn (1981) and Every So Often (1983). Although Moore’s work drew influence from European and American sources, his work has a characteristically British undertone. Since his death in 1987, photography’s expanded field of practice has emerged, freeing artists and photographers to explore themes and concerns beyond the established silos of practice of documentary and landscape. Moore’s photographic career overlapped several significant points in the history of the medium, yet his highly individualised practice sat outside both established and emerging conventions. Despite this rich complexity, a continuing legal uncertainty over the legacy of Raymond Moore’s archive has prevented a critical reevaluation of his work – his work is no longer accessible and as such, has not been exhibited or republished like many of his contemporaries.
    • Parabeln der Pflege: Kreative Reaktionen in der Demenzpflege, von Pflegenden erzählt

      Grennan, Simon; Priego, Ernesto; Wilkins, Peter; University of Chester; City University of London; Douglas College (City University of London, 2019-01-09)
      Parables of Care presents true stories of creative responses to dementia care, told by carers, taken from a group of over 100 case studies available at http://carenshare.city.ac.uk/. Creativity, emotional intelligence and common sense are amply shown in these 14 touching and informative stories. Drawn by Dr Simon Grennan with Christopher Sperandio. Edited and adapted by Dr Simon Grennan, Dr Ernesto Priego and Dr Peter Wilkins. Created with funding from City, University of London's MCSE School Impact Fund 2017, the University of Chester, UK and Douglas College, Vancouver, Canada. Diese 14 rührenden und informativen Geschichten zeigen viel Kreativität, Einfühlsamkeit und gesunden Menschenverstand. Parabeln der Pflege präsentiert wahre Geschichten über kreative Reaktionen in der Demenzpflege, die von Pflegenden erzählt wurden und aus einer Sammlung von über 100 Fallstudien in Großbritannien ausgewählt wurden. Diese englischsprachigen Fallstudien stehen auf http://carenshare.city.ac.uk zur Verfügung. Dies ist ein Projekt des Centre for Human Computer Interaction Design, City, der Universität London und der Universität Chester in Großbritannien, sowie des Douglas College in Vancouver, Kanada.
    • Parables of Care. Creative Responses to Dementia Care, As Told by Carers

      Grennan, Simon; Priego, Ernesto; Wilkins, Peter; University of Chester; City, Univerity of London; Douglas College (City, University of London, University of Chester, Douglas College., 2017-09-01)
      Parables of Care presents true stories of creative responses to dementia care, told by carers, taken from a group of over 100 case studies available at http://carenshare.city.ac.uk/. Creativity, emotional intelligence and common sense are amply shown in these 14 touching and informative stories. Drawn by Dr Simon Grennan with Christopher Sperandio. Edited and adapted by Dr Simon Grennan, Dr Ernesto Priego and Dr Peter Wilkins. Created with funding from City, University of London's MCSE School Impact Fund 2017, the University of Chester, UK and Douglas College, Vancouver, Canada.
    • Play as narration: ‘Composition No1’ and ‘Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim’ .

      Grennan, Simon; Hague, Ian; University of Chester, London College of Printing (9th ComFor Conference, Berlin., 2014-04-01)
      In reviews of Chris Ware’s Building Stories, critics regularly draw attention to the board-game like design of the comic’s box and elements of the text within. Yet while many have noted the similarities between Building Stories and the visual/physical design of board games such as Monopoly, and Ware himself has cited ‘French "Jeux Reunis" game sets from the late 19th and the early 20th century’ as one of the inspirations for the work’s design concept, few go as far as to suggest that Building Stories actually is a game. In this paper, Simon Grennan and Ian Hague will consider the ways in which Building Stories’ narrative structure mirrors those conventionally found in games. Drawing upon works published by Bethesda Softworks, such as Fallout 3, Fallout: New Vegas and the Elder Scrolls series, as well as comics including Jason Shiga’s Meanwhile and Actus Tragicus’ Actus Box: 5 Graphic Novellas, and literary works such as Marc Saporta’s Composition No.1 and B.S. Johnson’s The Unfortunates, Grennan and Hague will interrogate some of the formal and discursive relationships that open possibilities for revised interpretations of the differences between play and narrative, such as the productive structuring of choice, sources of narrative voice, the presence of untold plots, the impact of types of accumulated and excluded actions upon plot, and the narratological implications of subverting the social habits by which games, comics and literature are defined. Utilising Seymour Chatman’s 1978 theorisation of narrative as a ‘double time’ structure, being the time of the plot plus the time of the text, they will suggest that both games and comics promote specific discourse activities over others as conditions of comprehension, whilst sharing formal structures that are utilised in each register to underwrite the disctinctions between them. Hence, it is as possible to choose to read the cells of comic in any order as it is to choose one course of actions over another in a game. Grennan and Hague will analyse the degrees of similarity and difference between these options in their particular contexts, relative to an experience of a plot, in order to problematise the relationship between discourse and plot at the heart of Chatman’s theory.
    • Plot, picture and practice: comics, picture books and illustrated literary fiction.

      Grennan, Simon; University of Chester (Retrieving Illustration Conference,University of Agder, Norway., 2014-07-01)
      Reporting on a January 2012 joint session of the Modern Language Association of America’s Division on Children’s Literature and the Discussion Group on Comics and Graphic Narratives, co-convener Charles Hatfield stated, “Scholars of the picture book (Nodelman; Spaulding; Nikolajeva & Scott; op de Beeck) have noted the aesthetics and reading demands of comics. Conversely, comics theorists (McCloud; Varnum & Gibbons) have suggested formal likenesses between [them] —including shared aesthetic resources, the relevance of word/image theory to both, and the growing prominence of comics in children’s publishing and reading instruction.” Session contributor Perry Nodelman stated that the formal definitions of each register continually contradict and confound each other, whilst Phillip Nel theorised that differences between picture books and comics result from particular author poesis, generating clustering, but not absolute, habits of form. Developing this idea, Joseph Thomas noted that each registers’ governing conventions also dictate and direct the uses to which picture books and comics are put. Relationships between form and the conditions of production and use of books that utilise text and image also form the axis of a more recent paper by Joe Sutliff Sanders, who writes, “Despite the obvious differences between [picture books and comics], nearly all of the formal terms most commonly used to define one can also easily be applied to the other. Still, in one of the common observations about both forms—that words and images work together to create meaning—lies the first step in a path toward distinguishing the two.” (84) These formal terms include the identification and generalisation of different types of plot transition (page to page in picture books, panel to panel in comics), the distribution of plot events, the frequency of page turns, the distribution and types of information provided by text and images and the shapes, proportions and production materials of both registers, to note only a few. I should say immediately that this paper will consider only three types of book in which text and image are utilised to present the diegesis: comics for children and adult readers, picture books for children andIllustrated literary fiction for children and adult readers. Although some of the terms of my discussion plausibly find application in all text/image productions, for the purpose of this paper, I will set aside, for example, contemporary digital applications and 16th and 17th century emblem books to focus on the implications of making distinctions between these three.
    • Points of Departure - Sayle Gallery

      Quayle, Cian; University of Chester (Sayle Gallery, 2016-03-03)
      Points of Departure is an exhibition of paintings, printmaking and photography which was installed at the Sayle Gallery, Isle of Man: March 3rd - April 3rd 2016. This exhibition features forty artworks, which examine ideas of place shaped via a series of journeys and travels undertaken by the artist.
    • Practical Projects for Photographers: Developing rich practice through context

      Daly, Tim; University of Chester (Bloomsbury, 2018-07-01)
      The book will make explicit the benefit of linking practice skills with contextual research and knowledge. Each project will point students to well-known textual and visual contextual sources which will further develop their awareness. Unlike many titles in this subject area, this book joins together contextual underpinning and practice. In essence, both skills and contextual knowledge are embedded within each project rather than delivered as separate elements, so students effectively contextualise through practice. The projects work like a briefing document containing all the necessary information required to spark off practice ideas.
    • Pragmatics of Attachment and Detachment: a Constellatory Re-inscription of Textile.

      Bristow, Maxine; University of Chester (Wiley Blackwell, 2019)
      Like no other field of cultural studies, the study of textiles renders the boundaries of academic discipline elastic, and defies geographic and chronological borders. Previously dominated by empirical methods and writing, it has come of age as a field of interdisciplinary research during the past decade. 'A Companion to Textile Culture' aims to be an innovative, lively and authoritative collection of new writing that will embrace the historical, contemporary and cultural dimensions of textiles. While anchored in the history of art and visual studies, it will bring together approaches from many different fields of scholarly research, including anthropology, archaeology, literary studies, world histories and art and design, to reflect this new, expanded field of writing about textiles and the multiple viewpoints of its specialist contributors. Essays by leading experts in this broad interdisciplinary field of study will address the current state of scholarship and point to emerging issues. (Jennifer Harris volume editor: A Companion to Textile Culture) ‘Pragmatics of Attachment and Detachment: a Constellatory Re-inscription of Textile’ sits within a section of 'A Companion to Textile Culture' entitled ‘Contemporary Textiles: Conceptual Boundaries’ which explores some of the reasons why textiles have traditionally been undervalued in histories of 20th century visual culture and the shift in cultural values that moved them from the margins to an increasingly central role. My contribution provides an artist’s perspective that draws on a body of work that emerged out of a period of practice based doctoral research entitled ‘Pragmatics of Attachment and Detachment: medium (Un)Specificity as Material Agency in Contemporary Art’. It takes as its point of departure the creative challenge of how to acknowledge situated experience and communicate the particular richness and complexity of textile’s material and semantic conventions, whilst embracing the heterogeneity and creative freedom afforded by the post-medium condition of contemporary art. In the chapter I outline a conceptual framework and series of practice strategies that revolve around a dynamic process of assimilation and differentiation. Through a new body of sculptural and installational practice, I propose a constellatory opening up of textile where medium specificity is re-inscribed in terms of material agency and the cultural ambivalence of textile is re-envisioned as a productive indeterminacy. Within this (inter)relational re-mapping of textile’s complex somatic and semantic codes and conventions, textile is seen to be a medium of convergence and divergence where hierarchical disciplinary distinctions become untenable, meaning is suggested but unable to settle and categorical divisions between subject and object are destabilised.