• Tom Wood - The DPA Work (A Reprise - Revoiced): Photographs of Rainhill Hospital & Cammell Laird Shipyard

      Quayle, Cian; University of Chester
      In 2013, in collaboration with Tom Wood, Quayle curated an exhibition entitled The DPA Work – Photographs of Rainhill Hospital and Cammell Laird Shipyard at CASC (Contemporary Art Space Chester), University of Chester. The exhibitions featured Wood’s photographs of both institutions prior to their closure. Wood was originally supported by the Documentary Photography Archive and the Open Eye Gallery in conjunction with the mental health charity MIND. The DPA was founded by Audrey Linkman and established in Manchester in 1985. Linkman commissioned photographers with whom she collaborated in negotiating and gaining access into different walks of life across the North West. The exhibitions at CASC ran concurrently and formed part of the Parallel Programme for Look 13 Liverpool International Photography Festival. The project, for which I was lead researcher also involved students undertaking an Experiential Learning module. This involved their engagement with former shipyard workers and research into established as well as community based groups in recovering narratives and objects in order to reactivate lost dialogues. The students also made visual responses to the the exhibition’s context which were also formed part of the exhibition. This project has also been embedded as part of a teaching methodology in BA Photography at the University of Chester, which encourages and fosters ‘socially engaged practices’ across a range of contexts which will also be explored as well as visually evidenced as part of this paper.
    • A Trace of Actions Unseen: The Photographic Error as Photography ‘in performance’

      Piper-Wright, Tracy; University of Chester (2018-11-16)
      In contemporary digital photography the error is an increasingly rare and unusual phenomenon, but it presents valuable insights into the practice of photography. This article proposes time as a specific indicator of difference between the ‘conventional’ photograph and the error, based on a distinction between performativity and performance. The performance of the error takes place in three ‘acts’: the photographic event, image recording and interpretation by the viewer. In each stage the error’s relationship to time is shown to be ambiguous and multifaceted, counterpointing a simplified concept of time which prevails in the conventional photograph. The error exposes the entanglement of actors and relationships within the act of photographing and in so doing destabilises common assumptions about photographs as simple, immediate documents.
    • A Trace of Actions Unseen: The Photographic Error as Photography ‘in performance’

      Piper-Wright, Tracy; University of Chester (Instituto de História da Arte, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2022-04-01)
      In contemporary digital photography the accident or fault is an increasingly rare and unusual phenomenon, but it presents valuable insights into the practice of photography. This article discusses how the photographic error reveals qualities of the photographic experience normally hidden in conventional photographs, and proposes a reconsideration of time in relation to photography perceived through the accidental image. The error is conceived as a performance, extending the conventional time scales of the photograph from the ‘snap’ into three ‘acts’: the photographic event, the recording of an image and, lastly, interpretation by the viewer. In each stage the error’s relationship to time is shown to be ambiguous and multifaceted, counterpointing a simplified concept of time which prevails in the conventional photograph. The error exposes the entanglement of actors and relationships within the act of photographing and in so doing destabilises common assumptions about photographs as simple, immediate documents.
    • Transactions: Painting and photography

      Renshaw, John; Boetker-Smith, Daniel; University of Chester (2006-11-18)
      This exhibition, held at the Grosvenor Museum in Chester and organised jointly with the University of Chester, examines how abstract painting and photography enter into a fluid relationship of ‘cause and effect’. Painting becomes a catalyst for photography and, equally, photography leads to the creation of painting. These transactions invite the viewer to explore visual experience and the construction of meaning.
    • Transforming Anthony Trollope: 'Dispossession', Victorianism and 19th-century Word and Image

      Grennan, Simon; Grove, Laurence; University of Chester, University of Glasgow (Leuven University Press, 2015-05-01)
      An edited collection of eleven chapters. Introduction attached.
    • Travelling the Imaginary Landscape

      Piper-Wright, Tracy; University of Chester (University of Chester, 2016-07-01)
      Catalogue essay to accompany the exhibition "Death Returned Her to Rags" by Alexe Dilworth at FZKKE gallery, Euskirchen Germany 2016.
    • Unravelling photography

      Boetker-Smith, Daniel; Grainger, Karen; Heron, Fergus; Pontin, Matthew; University of Chester ; Independent Artist / University of Brighton / University of Plymouth ; University College Falmouth (Quay Arts, 2006)
      The Unravelling photography exhibition was held at the Matthew West Gallery in the Quay Arts Centre from 6 May to 10 June 2006. Four artists - Daniel Boetker-Smith, Matthew Pontin, Karen Grainger, and Fergus Heron - produced work which focuses on the ability of photography to question its own systems and visuality. The exhibition was presented as four distinct, yet related, projects ion the themes of unravelling looking, unravelling, memory, unravelling place, and unravelling perception. An accompanying exhibition catalogue was produced.
    • Using Mobile Technology to Facilitate Engagement with the Arts for Children with Autism and their Families

      Piper-Wright, Tracy; University of Chester (Springer International Publishing, 2017-07-19)
      This case study discusses the research project Show and Tell and provides an example of how collaboration across different creative disciplines, and within a field nominally unrelated to art and design, can yield successful results by applying creative perspectives to an existing problem.
    • Visuality and identity in post-millennial Indian graphic narratives, by E. Dawson Varughese. 2018. Palgrave Pivot, Palgrave, New York

      Grennan, Simon; University of Chester (Taylor and Francis, 2018-06-18)
      Review of Visuality and identity in post-millennial Indian graphic narratives, by E. Dawson Varughese.
    • Walking with Shadows: Index, Inscription and Event in Malcolm Lowry's In Ballast to the White Sea

      Quayle, Cian; University of Chester (Liverpool University Press, 2020-07-01)
      A series of 15 black and white photographs and writing authored in response to the publication of a scholarly edition of Malcolm Lowry’s lost novel In Ballast to the White Sea. The photographs are integrated in an essay entitled ‘Walking with Shadows’ – a photo-text – indebted to W.G. Sebald’s use of photographs in The Rings of Saturn (1995). A method adopted which fuses ‘fiction, travelogue, history and biography’ where the images offset or displace the narrative, rather than illustrate it, as the psychic and physical journey unfolds from page to page. The text also references Denis Hollier’s essay ‘Surrealist Precipitates: Shadows Don’t Cast Shadows’, in which the position of the artist /author and the role of the reader highlights the significance of André Breton’s novel and use of photographs in Nadja (1928). The correlation of these sources includes Michel de Certeau’s ‘Walking in the City’ in The Practice of Everyday Life (1984) and Paul Auster’s novella ‘City of Glass’ in New York Trilogy (1987) where the notion of the author / protagonist are posited as interchangeable positions, as they reveal the significance of a method, in which autobiography, fact and fiction coalesce. The photographs which are imbricated within the text function as a series of staging points and motifs, which index the journey undertaken by the novel’s key protagonist. In Lowry’s novel these are uncovered in a series of surreal, psychogeographic encounters across the urban terrain and landscape, and the sonic hum, which imbues his writing. The events and locations which define the novel were rediscovered, or otherwise substituted, as they are re-inscribed in text and image. The project also integrated archive and vernacular images, which include Edward Chambré Hardman’s photographs of Liverpool and the North West as the setting which provides the point of departure for Lowry’s novel and the terrain, which was revisited for this project.