• The Influence of Manga on the Graphic Novel

      Grennan, Simon; University of Chester (Cambridge University Press, 2018-08-01)
      Providing a range of cogent examples, this chapter describes the influences of the Manga genre of comics strip on the Graphic Novel genre, over the last 35 years, considering the functions of domestication, foreignisation and transmedia on readers, markets and forms.
    • The Intermittent Image

      Piper-Wright, Tracy; University of Chester (CIEBA-FBAUL and Edições Universitárias Lusófonas, 2016-11-18)
      Errors can occur in all photographic practice but the technology and culture of digital photography reduce opportunities for mistakes and the likelihood of any being retained or published. This has led to the removal of error from the prevailing image culture with the consequent foregrounding of accuracy and resemblance in relation to everyday photography practice. Error images disrupt the conventions of photographic representation and in so doing present an alternate conception of photography as emergent, processual and performative. The error image exposes photography as a human and technological ‘act’ and presents the viewer with a transformative visual experience which has aesthetic interest and value.
    • The Marie Duval Archive

      Grennan, Simon; Sabin, Roger; Waite, Julian; University of Chester, Central Saint Martins (University of Chester, 2016-03-31)
      A visual image database of the work of 19th-century cartoonist and actress Marie Duval.
    • The Marie Duval Archive: Memory and the Development of the Comic Strip Canon

      Grennan, Simon; University of Chester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018-09-23)
      This chapter describes the creation and publishing of The Marie Duval Archive, a free online image archive which brings together the known extant work of pioneering London cartoonist and theatre actress Marie Duval (1847–1890). It discusses how analysis of the current canon of nineteenth-century comic strips influenced both the purpose of The Archive and it’s form. Considering the impact of digitisation and remote archiving on the canon, this commentary finally describes the specific relationships between archive, canon and memory that The Archive articulates, relative to the disappearance from scholarly and public view of Duval’s work, with one notable exception, since the appearance of her last drawings in the 1880s.
    • The Shift Dress as Cultural Meaning

      Kealy-Morris, Elizabeth; University of Chester (Gold Word Publishing, 2018-02-08)
      This paper will offer a historic and semiotic analysis of the shift dress as essential to the middle and upper-middle class American woman’s wardrobe and its lasting influence on American sportswear and the collections of luxury brand collections as a signifier of understated feminine youthful health through movement. The shift dress can be traced back to the 1920s chemise. Dresses of that era, particularly those of Coco Chanel, featured exposed legs and arms, simple cuts, loose shapes and little waist definition. This was a move away from corsets and offered women both style and ease of movement. The shift dress became a staple of the American woman’s wardrobe in the 1960s and signified a new trend in women’s clothing as the garment promoted independence, modernity and a redefinition of the female shape. This paper argues that the shift dress’s key place in the American woman’s wardrobe reflects the unique historical and cultural influences on American dress from the birth of the new democratic nation in the Eighteenth century to the rise of the dominance of New York City’s ready-to-wear industry in the mid-Twentieth century and concurrent ideological expectations of the female form.
    • The value of uncertainty: The photographic error as embodied knowledge

      Piper-Wright, Tracy; University of Chester (2018-03-26)
      These days we rarely encounter photographs that have gone wrong: images that are blurred, out of focus, over or under exposed or just plain failed. But our failure to think about failure is having a detrimental impact on our relationship with photography and how we interpret photographic truth and meaning. A consequence of removing errors from the prevailing image culture is that accuracy and resemblance become the predominant visual signifiers of the photographs we see on a daily basis. Accurate photographs seem to depict things ‘as they are’, and to provide a transparent gateway to real events. These neutral, authorless photographs become the basis for an image economy where the tyranny of post-truth claims can take hold. Without a concept of photography as an embodied activity involving human decision making and the limitations of technology, the resulting image becomes the sole locus of attention for the truth claims about what it depicts. Photographic errors are important because they present us with evidence of the contingency of the photograph, breaking the spell of neutrality and reasserting human/technical relationship in the creation of the image. The proposed paper draws on my practice-based research project In Pursuit of Error which is a ethnographic study of the error in photographic practice. Theoretical models drawn from feminist theory, performance theory and aesthetics are used to interrogate the images and narratives collected from photographers. The error is revealed as a discontinuous but valued phenomenon which disrupts the conventions of photographic representation, and proposes the deliberate or accidental photographic error as an emergent, processual and performative act. The paper will argue that the error presents an alternative photographic epistemology from that found in contemporary visual culture: a form of ‘messy’, embodied knowledge which challenges a neutral and machine-led concept of photography in which veracity is the central signifier, proposing instead a concept of photography which acknowledges the subjectivity of the photographic ‘act-in-context’.
    • The Work of Maggie Jackson

      Turner, Jeremy; University of Chester (University of Chester, 2016-04-21)
      Catalogue entry to accompany exhibited work by Maggie Jackson
    • The ‘Epistemic Object’ in the Creative Process of Doctoral Inquiry

      Gray, Carole; Malins, Julian; Bristow, Maxine; University of Chester (Intellect Ltd., 2018-12-15)
      Within the framework of practice-led doctoral research in the art and design sector, there has long been debate about the role of the artefact/creative works in the process of inquiry and in the final submission for Ph.D. examination. Their status can be ambiguous and the concept of ‘exhibition’ is – we would argue – problematic in this context. In this chapter we want to suggest an alternative way of considering the role of artefacts/creative works in a doctoral submission, by discussing the liberating concept of ‘epistemic objects’ – their possible forms and agencies, and the alternative display/sharing of the understandings generated from these through ‘exposition’ not exhibition. Whilst our experience and expertise lies within the sector of art and design, we suggest that some ideas in this chapter may resonate and be relevant to other creative disciplines in the revealing and sharing of doctoral research outcomes. This process can be difficult and provoke many anxieties for the practitioner-researcher and their supervisors, so some clarity on this might help everyone involved in the examination of doctoral work to approach it with integrity and confidence, and see it as a valuable learning experience for all involved.
    • Thinking About Drawing: Introduction to Themes and Concepts

      Grennan, Simon; University of Chester
      'Thinking About Drawing: Introduction to Themes and Concepts' provides a short, accessible, illustrated guide to key ideas that are used to describe, understand and explain drawing, for students of art, design, media, architecture and engineering, at undergraduate level and above. This accessible and readable book explains the significance of relationships between the body and the mark, visual imitation, drawing systems, drawing and writing and visual story telling, providing a simple guide to key ideas. The book unpacks the key ideas that have shaped the rich, complex and foundational activity of drawing. It presents an unexpected, engaging and authoritative range of illustrated examples of drawings made by culturally and historically diverse people for different purposes, with different media, in widely different times and situations. 'Thinking About Drawing: Introduction to Themes and Concepts' is plainly written, avoiding jargon and specialist language. It is user-friendly. Ideas are arranged as chapters that can be read sequentially, building a complete guide to ideas about drawing. Alternatively, chapters can be read individually, providing self-contained introductions to one of these key ideas in drawing. 'Thinking About Drawing: Introduction to Themes and Concepts' provides a short, accessible, illustrated guide to key ideas that are used to describe, understand and explain drawing, for students of art, design, media, architecture and engineering, at undergraduate level and above. This accessible and readable book explains the significance of relationships between the body and the mark, visual imitation, drawing systems, drawing and writing and visual story telling, providing a simple guide to key ideas. The book unpacks the key ideas that have shaped the rich, complex and foundational activity of drawing. It presents an unexpected, engaging and authoritative range of illustrated examples of drawings made by culturally and historically diverse people for different purposes, with different media, in widely different times and situations. 'Thinking About Drawing: Introduction to Themes and Concepts' is plainly written, avoiding jargon and specialist language. It is user-friendly. Ideas are arranged as chapters that can be read sequentially, building a complete guide to ideas about drawing. Alternatively, chapters can be read individually, providing self-contained introductions to one of these key ideas in drawing.
    • Through the surface: Collaborating textiles artists from Britain and Japan

      Bristoe, Maxine; Chester College of Higher Education (2004-01-26)
      Through the suraface was an Anglo-Japanese mentoring exchange project which explored points of difference and similarity within the cultures of Japan and Britain and involved collaboration between textile articles who were at different stahes of career development. Maxine Bristow mentored the Jaapanese artist Kyoko Nitta and contributed an essay - Material trace-marking time and defining space - to the accompanying booklet.
    • Tom Wood - The DPA Work

      Quayle, Cian; University of Chester
      'Tom Wood - The DPA Work' is the culmination of a long term research project led by Dr Cian Quayle. The Documentary Photography Archive was founded by Audrey Linkman, in Manchester, in 1985. In 2012 photographer Tom Wood invited Quayle to investigate an archive of two landmark commissions which he had undertaken for the DPA, which had lain dormant and unseen since their deposit with the DPA and holding at Greater Manchester County Record Office. Wood first exhibited a selection of the Rainhill Hospital photographs at the Open Eye Gallery in 1988, and in 2020 current Open Eye Executive Director Sarah Fisher has described the instrumental significance of Quayle's role as 'independent researcher-curator' evidenced in new writing, the collaborations, commissions, exhibitions, publications and events, which he has curated, authored, edited, and published. The development of the book project emanated from The DPA Work exhibitions at Contemporary Art Space Chester, which featured as part of Look 13 Liverpool International Photography Festival and the publication of Tom Wood - The DPA Work are the culmination of this research. In his writing Quayle contextualised the origin of the DPA projects, the subsequent journey, reception and wider reach of Wood's work. The introductory, contextual essay 'Tom Wood - The DPA Work' revisits the basis for the original commissions and their contemporary significance and wider contextual understanding and interpretation.
    • Tom Wood - The DPA Work (A Reprise - Revoiced): Photographs of Rainhill Hospital & Cammell Laird Shipyard

      Quayle, Cian; University of Chester
      In 2013, in collaboration with Tom Wood, Quayle curated an exhibition entitled The DPA Work – Photographs of Rainhill Hospital and Cammell Laird Shipyard at CASC (Contemporary Art Space Chester), University of Chester. The exhibitions featured Wood’s photographs of both institutions prior to their closure. Wood was originally supported by the Documentary Photography Archive and the Open Eye Gallery in conjunction with the mental health charity MIND. The DPA was founded by Audrey Linkman and established in Manchester in 1985. Linkman commissioned photographers with whom she collaborated in negotiating and gaining access into different walks of life across the North West. The exhibitions at CASC ran concurrently and formed part of the Parallel Programme for Look 13 Liverpool International Photography Festival. The project, for which I was lead researcher also involved students undertaking an Experiential Learning module. This involved their engagement with former shipyard workers and research into established as well as community based groups in recovering narratives and objects in order to reactivate lost dialogues. The students also made visual responses to the the exhibition’s context which were also formed part of the exhibition. This project has also been embedded as part of a teaching methodology in BA Photography at the University of Chester, which encourages and fosters ‘socially engaged practices’ across a range of contexts which will also be explored as well as visually evidenced as part of this paper.
    • A Trace of Actions Unseen: The Photographic Error as Photography ‘in performance’

      Piper-Wright, Tracy; University of Chester (2018-11-16)
      In contemporary digital photography the error is an increasingly rare and unusual phenomenon, but it presents valuable insights into the practice of photography. This article proposes time as a specific indicator of difference between the ‘conventional’ photograph and the error, based on a distinction between performativity and performance. The performance of the error takes place in three ‘acts’: the photographic event, image recording and interpretation by the viewer. In each stage the error’s relationship to time is shown to be ambiguous and multifaceted, counterpointing a simplified concept of time which prevails in the conventional photograph. The error exposes the entanglement of actors and relationships within the act of photographing and in so doing destabilises common assumptions about photographs as simple, immediate documents.
    • A Trace of Actions Unseen: The Photographic Error as Photography ‘in performance’

      Piper-Wright, Tracy; University of Chester
      In contemporary digital photography the accident or fault is an increasingly rare and unusual phenomenon, but it presents valuable insights into the practice of photography. This article discusses how the photographic error reveals qualities of the photographic experience normally hidden in conventional photographs, and proposes a reconsideration of time in relation to photography perceived through the accidental image. The error is conceived as a performance, extending the conventional time scales of the photograph from the ‘snap’ into three ‘acts’: the photographic event, the recording of an image and, lastly, interpretation by the viewer. In each stage the error’s relationship to time is shown to be ambiguous and multifaceted, counterpointing a simplified concept of time which prevails in the conventional photograph. The error exposes the entanglement of actors and relationships within the act of photographing and in so doing destabilises common assumptions about photographs as simple, immediate documents.
    • Transactions: Painting and photography

      Renshaw, John; Boetker-Smith, Daniel; University of Chester (2006-11-18)
      This exhibition, held at the Grosvenor Museum in Chester and organised jointly with the University of Chester, examines how abstract painting and photography enter into a fluid relationship of ‘cause and effect’. Painting becomes a catalyst for photography and, equally, photography leads to the creation of painting. These transactions invite the viewer to explore visual experience and the construction of meaning.
    • Transforming Anthony Trollope: 'Dispossession', Victorianism and 19th-century Word and Image

      Grennan, Simon; Grove, Laurence; University of Chester, University of Glasgow (Leuven University Press, 2015-05-01)
      An edited collection of eleven chapters. Introduction attached.
    • Travelling the Imaginary Landscape

      Piper-Wright, Tracy; University of Chester (University of Chester, 2016-07-01)
      Catalogue essay to accompany the exhibition "Death Returned Her to Rags" by Alexe Dilworth at FZKKE gallery, Euskirchen Germany 2016.
    • Unravelling photography

      Boetker-Smith, Daniel; Grainger, Karen; Heron, Fergus; Pontin, Matthew; University of Chester ; Independent Artist / University of Brighton / University of Plymouth ; University College Falmouth (Quay Arts, 2006)
      The Unravelling photography exhibition was held at the Matthew West Gallery in the Quay Arts Centre from 6 May to 10 June 2006. Four artists - Daniel Boetker-Smith, Matthew Pontin, Karen Grainger, and Fergus Heron - produced work which focuses on the ability of photography to question its own systems and visuality. The exhibition was presented as four distinct, yet related, projects ion the themes of unravelling looking, unravelling, memory, unravelling place, and unravelling perception. An accompanying exhibition catalogue was produced.
    • Using Mobile Technology to Facilitate Engagement with the Arts for Children with Autism and their Families

      Piper-Wright, Tracy; University of Chester (Springer International Publishing, 2017-07-19)
      This case study discusses the research project Show and Tell and provides an example of how collaboration across different creative disciplines, and within a field nominally unrelated to art and design, can yield successful results by applying creative perspectives to an existing problem.
    • Visuality and identity in post-millennial Indian graphic narratives, by E. Dawson Varughese. 2018. Palgrave Pivot, Palgrave, New York

      Grennan, Simon; University of Chester (Taylor and Francis, 2018-06-18)
      Review of Visuality and identity in post-millennial Indian graphic narratives, by E. Dawson Varughese.