Hunger, thirst, and energy intakes following consumption of caloric beverages

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/90178
Title:
Hunger, thirst, and energy intakes following consumption of caloric beverages
Authors:
Almiron-Roig, Eva; Drewnowski, Adam
Abstract:
Whereas soft drinks are described as primarily thirst-quenching liquids, juices and milk are said to be liquid foods, with a greater satiating power. This study was conducted to compare the effects of orange juice, low-fat milk (1%), regular cola, and sparkling water on hunger, thirst, satiety, and energy intakes at the next meal. Thirty-two volunteers (14 men and 18 women), ages 18–35 years, consumed a breakfast preload composed of 590 ml (20 oz) of an energy-containing beverage (1036 kJ) or water (0 kJ) and a slice of toast (418 kJ) on four different occasions. Participants rated hunger, thirst, fullness, and desire to eat at baseline and at 20-min intervals for 2 h following preload ingestion. A tray lunch was presented at 2 h, 15 min and food consumption was measured. Compared to sparkling water, the three energy-containing beverages were associated with higher fullness and reduced hunger rating and desire to eat. However, energy intakes at lunch (4511±151 kJ for men and 3183±203 kJ for women) were the same across all four beverage conditions and no compensation for breakfast energy was observed. The three beverages of equal energy value were significantly different from sparkling water, but not from each other, in their effects on hunger and satiety ratings. All four beverages satisfied thirst equally well. Whether energy-containing cola, juice, and low-fat milk facilitate a positive energy balance remains a topic for further study.
Affiliation:
University of Washington
Citation:
Physiology & Behavior, 79, 2003, pp. 767-773.
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Physiology & Behavior
Publication Date:
2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/90178
DOI:
10.1016/S0031-9384(03)00212-9
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00319384
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This article is not available through ChesterRep.
ISSN:
0031-9384
Sponsors:
This article was submitted to the RAE2008 for the University of Chester - Allied Health Professions and Studies.
Appears in Collections:
Biological Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAlmiron-Roig, Evaen
dc.contributor.authorDrewnowski, Adamen
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-20T16:29:53Z-
dc.date.available2010-01-20T16:29:53Z-
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.identifier.citationPhysiology & Behavior, 79, 2003, pp. 767-773.en
dc.identifier.issn0031-9384-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0031-9384(03)00212-9-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/90178-
dc.descriptionThis article is not available through ChesterRep.en
dc.description.abstractWhereas soft drinks are described as primarily thirst-quenching liquids, juices and milk are said to be liquid foods, with a greater satiating power. This study was conducted to compare the effects of orange juice, low-fat milk (1%), regular cola, and sparkling water on hunger, thirst, satiety, and energy intakes at the next meal. Thirty-two volunteers (14 men and 18 women), ages 18–35 years, consumed a breakfast preload composed of 590 ml (20 oz) of an energy-containing beverage (1036 kJ) or water (0 kJ) and a slice of toast (418 kJ) on four different occasions. Participants rated hunger, thirst, fullness, and desire to eat at baseline and at 20-min intervals for 2 h following preload ingestion. A tray lunch was presented at 2 h, 15 min and food consumption was measured. Compared to sparkling water, the three energy-containing beverages were associated with higher fullness and reduced hunger rating and desire to eat. However, energy intakes at lunch (4511±151 kJ for men and 3183±203 kJ for women) were the same across all four beverage conditions and no compensation for breakfast energy was observed. The three beverages of equal energy value were significantly different from sparkling water, but not from each other, in their effects on hunger and satiety ratings. All four beverages satisfied thirst equally well. Whether energy-containing cola, juice, and low-fat milk facilitate a positive energy balance remains a topic for further study.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis article was submitted to the RAE2008 for the University of Chester - Allied Health Professions and Studies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00319384en
dc.subjecthunger-
dc.subjectthirst-
dc.subjectcalorific beverages-
dc.titleHunger, thirst, and energy intakes following consumption of caloric beveragesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Washingtonen
dc.identifier.journalPhysiology & Behavioren
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