Postcolonial town planning in Commonwealth nations: A case study of the Solomon Islands - an agenda for change

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/87014
Title:
Postcolonial town planning in Commonwealth nations: A case study of the Solomon Islands - an agenda for change
Authors:
Talbot, Jon; Ronnie, Buddley
Abstract:
The principal argument advanced in this paper is that spatial planning in the Solomon Islands has failed to deliver any substantive benefits and is therefore in urgent need of reform. The present model of planning, derived from a combination of colonial practice and legislation originating in the UK, does not add much, if any, value to the development process. The poor quality of planning in the Solomons cannot be seen in isolation. There are similar systems in use throughout much of the Commonwealth and anecdotal evidence suggests that the failings are widely duplicated. The Solomon Islands only appear exceptional in the extent to which other government systems have demonstrably broken down, following the 'Ethnic Tension' of 2000 - 03. The Regional Assistance Mission to the Solomon Islands (RAMSI) provides a unique opportunity for a review of the way in which planning operates. A number of issues are identified which any reformed system must address.
Affiliation:
University of Chester ; Physical Planning Department, Honiara, Solomon Islands
Citation:
The Round Table: The Commonwealth Journal of International Affairs, 2007, 960(390), pp. 319-329.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
The Round Table
Publication Date:
Jun-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/87014
DOI:
10.1080/00358530701463915
Additional Links:
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t713448095~link=cover
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is the author's PDF version of an article published in The Round Table: The Commonwealth Journal of International Affairs© 2007. The definitive version is available at www.informaworld.com
ISSN:
00358533; 14654008
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Work Related Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTalbot, Jonen
dc.contributor.authorRonnie, Buddleyen
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-27T09:52:44Z-
dc.date.available2009-11-27T09:52:44Z-
dc.date.issued2007-06-
dc.identifier.citationThe Round Table: The Commonwealth Journal of International Affairs, 2007, 960(390), pp. 319-329.en
dc.identifier.issn00358533-
dc.identifier.issn14654008-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00358530701463915-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/87014-
dc.descriptionThis is the author's PDF version of an article published in The Round Table: The Commonwealth Journal of International Affairs© 2007. The definitive version is available at www.informaworld.comen
dc.description.abstractThe principal argument advanced in this paper is that spatial planning in the Solomon Islands has failed to deliver any substantive benefits and is therefore in urgent need of reform. The present model of planning, derived from a combination of colonial practice and legislation originating in the UK, does not add much, if any, value to the development process. The poor quality of planning in the Solomons cannot be seen in isolation. There are similar systems in use throughout much of the Commonwealth and anecdotal evidence suggests that the failings are widely duplicated. The Solomon Islands only appear exceptional in the extent to which other government systems have demonstrably broken down, following the 'Ethnic Tension' of 2000 - 03. The Regional Assistance Mission to the Solomon Islands (RAMSI) provides a unique opportunity for a review of the way in which planning operates. A number of issues are identified which any reformed system must address.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t713448095~link=coveren
dc.subjectSolomon Islandsen
dc.subjectspatial planningen
dc.subjecttown and country planningen
dc.subjectgovernanceen
dc.subjectland use managementen
dc.titlePostcolonial town planning in Commonwealth nations: A case study of the Solomon Islands - an agenda for changeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester ; Physical Planning Department, Honiara, Solomon Islandsen
dc.identifier.journalThe Round Tableen
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