The charitable work of the Macclesfield silk manufacturers, 1750-1900

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/81282
Title:
The charitable work of the Macclesfield silk manufacturers, 1750-1900
Authors:
Griffiths, Sarah J.
Abstract:
The existing literature on philanthropic effort during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries has taken a number of different approaches to the subject. These include general works charting the development of the charitable sector, the exploration of voluntary organisations as a subsidiary topic to broader themes and regional studies adopting a range of perspectives. Most research in this latter category has been conducted on large towns and cities that generally have copious amounts of source material. In contrast, lesser provincial towns have received relatively little scholarly attention, despite the more manageable nature of their documentation. The aim of this thesis is to explore the growth of charitable organisations within Macclesfield, an East Cheshire industrial town that was dominated by the silk industry. This study concentrates on the period from 1750 to 1900, when the silk industry was dominant within the town and philanthropic activity was at its height. The town’s silk manufacturers were renowned for their charitable work and thus this research focuses on the extent to which this occupational group was critical in the development of Macclesfield’s voluntary institutions, the motives that lay behind their contributions, and their achievements. In order to see whether their involvement was typical of other businessmen, comparisons are drawn throughout with the charitable activities of contemporary entrepreneurs in a variety of urban settings. This study investigates the silk manufacturers’ participation in Macclesfield’s voluntary institutions in the fields of religion, education, public services and public amenities, together with any additional charitable acts. The evidence from all these areas suggests that in most cases the silk manufacturers were heavily involved in funding and managing these institutions. Their obvious motives reflected altruistic, religious and educational beliefs, but there were also a variety of other concerns that could have been contributory in determining their support for particular institutions. The primary achievement of Macclesfield’s voluntary sector was to provide a network of services that, in conjunction with later state initiatives, improved living standards for inhabitants by the end of the nineteenth century. This thesis gives an insight into the development of charitable institutions in a medium sized industrial town and demonstrates how one group of businessmen were able to dominate this field. Many silk manufacturers were generous in their support of charitable causes in Macclesfield, but the scale of their support did not match that of some other notable philanthropic families, such as the Crossleys of Halifax. The charitable work of the silk manufacturers appeared to be broadly similar to that of entrepreneurs in other small and medium sized industrial towns where they could form a dominant occupational group in public life. In larger towns and cities, this strong manufacturer influence was less evident and a greater range of other people contributed significantly to philanthropic institutions. This type of approach supplements the existing material on philanthropic effort during the long nineteenth century and overlaps a number of related subject areas, such as urban élite activity and the growth of the welfare state.
Advisors:
Gaunt, Peter; Lewis, Chris; Starkey, Pat
Citation:
Griffiths, S. (2008). Businessmen and benefactors: The Macclesfield silk manufacturers and their support for the town's charitable institutions, 1750-1900. Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire, 157, 67-92. Griffiths, S. (2011). The supporters of the Macclesfield Society for Acquiring Useful Knowledge. Northern History, 48(2), 295-314.
Publisher:
University of Liverpool (University of Chester)
Publication Date:
Apr-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/81282
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorGaunt, Peteren
dc.contributor.advisorLewis, Chrisen
dc.contributor.advisorStarkey, Paten
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Sarah J.en
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-16T13:45:44Zen
dc.date.available2009-09-16T13:45:44Zen
dc.date.issued2006-04en
dc.identifieruk.bl.ethos.433015en
dc.identifier.citationGriffiths, S. (2008). Businessmen and benefactors: The Macclesfield silk manufacturers and their support for the town's charitable institutions, 1750-1900. Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire, 157, 67-92. Griffiths, S. (2011). The supporters of the Macclesfield Society for Acquiring Useful Knowledge. Northern History, 48(2), 295-314.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/81282en
dc.description.abstractThe existing literature on philanthropic effort during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries has taken a number of different approaches to the subject. These include general works charting the development of the charitable sector, the exploration of voluntary organisations as a subsidiary topic to broader themes and regional studies adopting a range of perspectives. Most research in this latter category has been conducted on large towns and cities that generally have copious amounts of source material. In contrast, lesser provincial towns have received relatively little scholarly attention, despite the more manageable nature of their documentation. The aim of this thesis is to explore the growth of charitable organisations within Macclesfield, an East Cheshire industrial town that was dominated by the silk industry. This study concentrates on the period from 1750 to 1900, when the silk industry was dominant within the town and philanthropic activity was at its height. The town’s silk manufacturers were renowned for their charitable work and thus this research focuses on the extent to which this occupational group was critical in the development of Macclesfield’s voluntary institutions, the motives that lay behind their contributions, and their achievements. In order to see whether their involvement was typical of other businessmen, comparisons are drawn throughout with the charitable activities of contemporary entrepreneurs in a variety of urban settings. This study investigates the silk manufacturers’ participation in Macclesfield’s voluntary institutions in the fields of religion, education, public services and public amenities, together with any additional charitable acts. The evidence from all these areas suggests that in most cases the silk manufacturers were heavily involved in funding and managing these institutions. Their obvious motives reflected altruistic, religious and educational beliefs, but there were also a variety of other concerns that could have been contributory in determining their support for particular institutions. The primary achievement of Macclesfield’s voluntary sector was to provide a network of services that, in conjunction with later state initiatives, improved living standards for inhabitants by the end of the nineteenth century. This thesis gives an insight into the development of charitable institutions in a medium sized industrial town and demonstrates how one group of businessmen were able to dominate this field. Many silk manufacturers were generous in their support of charitable causes in Macclesfield, but the scale of their support did not match that of some other notable philanthropic families, such as the Crossleys of Halifax. The charitable work of the silk manufacturers appeared to be broadly similar to that of entrepreneurs in other small and medium sized industrial towns where they could form a dominant occupational group in public life. In larger towns and cities, this strong manufacturer influence was less evident and a greater range of other people contributed significantly to philanthropic institutions. This type of approach supplements the existing material on philanthropic effort during the long nineteenth century and overlaps a number of related subject areas, such as urban élite activity and the growth of the welfare state.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Liverpool (University of Chester)en
dc.rightsImages from the collection of Macclesfield Museum Trust reproduced with kind permission. Images from Calladine & Fricker's East Cheshire textile mills reproduced with kind permission of English Heritage.en
dc.subjectMacclesfielden
dc.subjectsilk manufacturersen
dc.subjectcharitiesen
dc.subjectnineteenth centuryen
dc.subjectreligious institutionsen
dc.subjectpublic serviceen
dc.titleThe charitable work of the Macclesfield silk manufacturers, 1750-1900en
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
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