The historical problems of travel for women undertaking geological fieldwork

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/71734
Title:
The historical problems of travel for women undertaking geological fieldwork
Authors:
Burek, Cynthia V.; Kolbl-Ebert, Martina
Abstract:
From unsuitable clothes to a lack of chaperones, from sexual harrassment to lack of proper funding, throughout history women geologists have encountered difficulties travelling to their field location or wotking in the field, whether these locations were close by or abroad. From Etheldred Benett to the present day problems are often sociological and political as well as logistical. Most early women geologists were able to avoid many difficulties because they were protected through working locally where their high social standing was known and respected or because they worked in a team with husband, father, or brother. However the problem developed virulence in the second half of the nineteenth century when women started to appear as students and professionally trained geologists. The single travelling women geologist had to face desciminating attitudes, ranging from pity to disregard and even to sexual harrassment. Benevolent society also had its problems with these women when, for example, professors needed their wives as chaperones to take women students on field trips.
Affiliation:
University of Chester ; Jura-Museum, Willibaldsburg
Citation:
In C.V. Burek & B. Higgs (Eds.), The role of women in the history of geology (pp. 115-122). London: The Geological Society of London, 2007
Publisher:
The Geological Society of London
Publication Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/71734
DOI:
10.1144/SP281.7
Additional Links:
http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/index.html
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Description:
This book chapter is not available through ChesterRep.
Series/Report no.:
Geological Society of London special publication; 281
ISSN:
9781862392274
Sponsors:
This book chapter was submitted to the RAE2008 for the University of Chester - Geography and Environmental Studies.
Appears in Collections:
Biological Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBurek, Cynthia V.en
dc.contributor.authorKolbl-Ebert, Martinaen
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-26T17:38:23Zen
dc.date.available2009-06-26T17:38:23Zen
dc.date.issued2007en
dc.identifier.citationIn C.V. Burek & B. Higgs (Eds.), The role of women in the history of geology (pp. 115-122). London: The Geological Society of London, 2007en
dc.identifier.issn9781862392274en
dc.identifier.doi10.1144/SP281.7en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/71734en
dc.descriptionThis book chapter is not available through ChesterRep.en
dc.description.abstractFrom unsuitable clothes to a lack of chaperones, from sexual harrassment to lack of proper funding, throughout history women geologists have encountered difficulties travelling to their field location or wotking in the field, whether these locations were close by or abroad. From Etheldred Benett to the present day problems are often sociological and political as well as logistical. Most early women geologists were able to avoid many difficulties because they were protected through working locally where their high social standing was known and respected or because they worked in a team with husband, father, or brother. However the problem developed virulence in the second half of the nineteenth century when women started to appear as students and professionally trained geologists. The single travelling women geologist had to face desciminating attitudes, ranging from pity to disregard and even to sexual harrassment. Benevolent society also had its problems with these women when, for example, professors needed their wives as chaperones to take women students on field trips.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis book chapter was submitted to the RAE2008 for the University of Chester - Geography and Environmental Studies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Geological Society of Londonen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGeological Society of London special publicationen
dc.relation.ispartofseries281en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.geolsoc.org.uk/index.htmlen
dc.subjectgeological fieldworken
dc.subjectwomenen
dc.titleThe historical problems of travel for women undertaking geological fieldworken
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester ; Jura-Museum, Willibaldsburgen
All Items in ChesterRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.