A simple procedure for investigating differences in sexual dimorphism between populations

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/64837
Title:
A simple procedure for investigating differences in sexual dimorphism between populations
Authors:
Lewis, Stephen J.
Abstract:
Although sexual dimorphism has a strong genetic component in many animals, external factors may alter its expression - enhancing or diminishing it depending on the parameter measured and the type of influence experienced. A measure of sexual dimorphism may be used, therefore, to characterise a whole population and the factors acting upon it. Differences between populations for such factors may then be investigated by comparing sexual dimorphisms and may be more informative than merely comparing population means. A quick and relatively simple technique which provides a coefficient of the relationship between a continuous variable and another which is dichotomous, such as sex, is the point biserial correlation. This is a less frequently described extension of the commonly used Pearson product-moment correlation. The point-biserial correlation coefficients can be calculated for a given parameter and compared to determine whether the same sexual dimorphism is evident in different samples. If it is not, some factor influencing one or other population, as a whole, may require further investigation. The full procedure, which can be performed without the need for statistical tables, and the necessary formulae are described. This method, in its generalised form, may also be applied to the study of bilateral asymmetry.
Affiliation:
Chester College of Higher Education
Citation:
In K. Boyle & S. Anderson (Eds.), Computing and statistics in osteoarchaeology (pp. 35-37). Oxford: Oxbow Books, 1997.
Publisher:
Oxbow Books (for The Osteoarchaeological Research Group)
Publication Date:
1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/64837
Additional Links:
http://www.oxbowbooks.com/home.cfm
Type:
Book chapter; Meetings and Proceedings
Language:
en
Description:
This is the author's PDF version of an book chapter published in Computing and statistics in osteoarchaeology ©1997. The paper was originally delivered at the second meeting of the Osteoarchaeological Research Group at the Institute of Archaeology, University College, London on 8 April 1995.
ISBN:
1900188465
Appears in Collections:
Biological Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Stephen J.-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-14T13:53:25Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-14T13:53:25Z-
dc.date.issued1997-
dc.identifier.citationIn K. Boyle & S. Anderson (Eds.), Computing and statistics in osteoarchaeology (pp. 35-37). Oxford: Oxbow Books, 1997.en
dc.identifier.isbn1900188465-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/64837-
dc.descriptionThis is the author's PDF version of an book chapter published in Computing and statistics in osteoarchaeology ©1997. The paper was originally delivered at the second meeting of the Osteoarchaeological Research Group at the Institute of Archaeology, University College, London on 8 April 1995.en
dc.description.abstractAlthough sexual dimorphism has a strong genetic component in many animals, external factors may alter its expression - enhancing or diminishing it depending on the parameter measured and the type of influence experienced. A measure of sexual dimorphism may be used, therefore, to characterise a whole population and the factors acting upon it. Differences between populations for such factors may then be investigated by comparing sexual dimorphisms and may be more informative than merely comparing population means. A quick and relatively simple technique which provides a coefficient of the relationship between a continuous variable and another which is dichotomous, such as sex, is the point biserial correlation. This is a less frequently described extension of the commonly used Pearson product-moment correlation. The point-biserial correlation coefficients can be calculated for a given parameter and compared to determine whether the same sexual dimorphism is evident in different samples. If it is not, some factor influencing one or other population, as a whole, may require further investigation. The full procedure, which can be performed without the need for statistical tables, and the necessary formulae are described. This method, in its generalised form, may also be applied to the study of bilateral asymmetry.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxbow Books (for The Osteoarchaeological Research Group)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.oxbowbooks.com/home.cfmen
dc.subjectsexual dimorphismen
dc.titleA simple procedure for investigating differences in sexual dimorphism between populationsen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentChester College of Higher Educationen
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