Higher risk of gastrointestinal parasite infection at lower elevation suggests possible constraints in the distributional niche of Alpine marmots

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/621075
Title:
Higher risk of gastrointestinal parasite infection at lower elevation suggests possible constraints in the distributional niche of Alpine marmots
Authors:
Zanet, Stefania; Miglio, Giacomo; Ferrari, Caterina; Bassano, Bruno; Ferroglio, Ezio; von Hardenberg, Achaz
Abstract:
Alpine marmots Marmota marmota occupy a narrow altitudinal niche within high elevation alpine environments. For animals living at such high elevations where resources are limited, parasitism represents a potential major cost in life history. Using occupancy models, we tested if marmots living at higher elevation have a reduced risk of being infected with gastrointestinal helminths, possibly compensating the lower availability of resources (shorter feeding season, longer snow cover and lower temperature) than marmots inhabiting lower elevations. Detection probability of eggs and oncospheres of two gastro-intestinal helminthic parasites, Ascaris laevis and Ctenotaenia marmotae, sampled in marmot feces, was used as a proxy of parasite abundance. As predicted, the models showed a negative relationship between elevation and parasite detectability (i.e. abundance) for both species, while there appeared to be a negative effect of solar radiance only for C. marmotae. Site-occupancy models are used here for the first time to model the constrains of gastrointestinal parasitism on a wild species and the relationship existing between endoparasites and environmental factors in a population of free-living animals. The results of this study suggest the future use of site-occupancy models as a viable tool to account for parasite imperfect detection in ecoparasitological studies, and give useful insights to further investigate the hypothesis of the contribution of parasite infection in constraining the altitudinal niche of Alpine marmots.
Affiliation:
Università di Torino; Gran Paradiso National Park; University of Chester
Citation:
Zanet, S., Miglio, G., Ferrari, C., Bassano, B., Ferroglio, E., von Hardenberg, A. (2017). Higher risk of gastrointestinal parasite infection at lower elevation suggests possible constraints in the distributional niche of Alpine marmots. PLoS ONE, 12(8), e0182477. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0182477
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Journal:
PLoS ONE
Publication Date:
1-Aug-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/621075
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0182477
Additional Links:
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0182477&type=printable
Type:
Article
Language:
en
EISSN:
1932-6203
Appears in Collections:
Biological Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZanet, Stefaniaen
dc.contributor.authorMiglio, Giacomoen
dc.contributor.authorFerrari, Caterinaen
dc.contributor.authorBassano, Brunoen
dc.contributor.authorFerroglio, Ezioen
dc.contributor.authorvon Hardenberg, Achazen
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-11T10:16:57Z-
dc.date.available2018-04-11T10:16:57Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-01-
dc.identifier.citationZanet, S., Miglio, G., Ferrari, C., Bassano, B., Ferroglio, E., von Hardenberg, A. (2017). Higher risk of gastrointestinal parasite infection at lower elevation suggests possible constraints in the distributional niche of Alpine marmots. PLoS ONE, 12(8), e0182477. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0182477en
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0182477-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/621075-
dc.description.abstractAlpine marmots Marmota marmota occupy a narrow altitudinal niche within high elevation alpine environments. For animals living at such high elevations where resources are limited, parasitism represents a potential major cost in life history. Using occupancy models, we tested if marmots living at higher elevation have a reduced risk of being infected with gastrointestinal helminths, possibly compensating the lower availability of resources (shorter feeding season, longer snow cover and lower temperature) than marmots inhabiting lower elevations. Detection probability of eggs and oncospheres of two gastro-intestinal helminthic parasites, Ascaris laevis and Ctenotaenia marmotae, sampled in marmot feces, was used as a proxy of parasite abundance. As predicted, the models showed a negative relationship between elevation and parasite detectability (i.e. abundance) for both species, while there appeared to be a negative effect of solar radiance only for C. marmotae. Site-occupancy models are used here for the first time to model the constrains of gastrointestinal parasitism on a wild species and the relationship existing between endoparasites and environmental factors in a population of free-living animals. The results of this study suggest the future use of site-occupancy models as a viable tool to account for parasite imperfect detection in ecoparasitological studies, and give useful insights to further investigate the hypothesis of the contribution of parasite infection in constraining the altitudinal niche of Alpine marmots.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0182477&type=printableen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectAlpine marmoten
dc.subjectparasitesen
dc.titleHigher risk of gastrointestinal parasite infection at lower elevation suggests possible constraints in the distributional niche of Alpine marmotsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversità di Torino; Gran Paradiso National Park; University of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalPLoS ONEen
dc.date.accepted2017-07-19-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-08-01-
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