Near-death experience in Indian religions: Encountering Yama

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/621026
Title:
Near-death experience in Indian religions: Encountering Yama
Authors:
Stockton, Shona
Abstract:
Visions and possessions are closely linked to one another. They can be either negative or positive experiences. They are also known to derive from a variety of circumstances, which include: illness (temporary or life threatening), the side-effects of drugs (i.e. anaesthetic or soma), and states of unconsciousness (i.e. dreams or visitations). However, when they involve an encounter with Yama (the Hindu Lord of the Dead), I propose they should be considered the equivalent of near-death experience (NDE). To investigate this, I will examine a variety of textual sources from a historical point of view. The selected material is from three different periods and will be discussed in a chronological order to appreciate the changing of religious beliefs in South Asia. The first collection of literature belongs to the Vedic period and consists of mythological narratives from Rgveda, Atharvaveda, and the Upanisads. The second include the Mahabharata and Puranas (Post-Vedic period), and the third assortment are contemporary ethnographic accounts. A comparative analysis of these sources permits to acknowledge how near-death experiences in India have changed from a sacrificial culture into one primarily concerned with the concept of karma (action) and its social and otherworldly outcomes, that is reward and punishment.
Citation:
Stockton, S. N. (2017). Near-death experience in Indian religions: Encountering Yama. (Masters thesis). University of Chester, United Kingdom.
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
Sep-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/621026
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStockton, Shonaen
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-26T14:42:45Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-26T14:42:45Z-
dc.date.issued2017-09-
dc.identifier.citationStockton, S. N. (2017). Near-death experience in Indian religions: Encountering Yama. (Masters thesis). University of Chester, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/621026-
dc.description.abstractVisions and possessions are closely linked to one another. They can be either negative or positive experiences. They are also known to derive from a variety of circumstances, which include: illness (temporary or life threatening), the side-effects of drugs (i.e. anaesthetic or soma), and states of unconsciousness (i.e. dreams or visitations). However, when they involve an encounter with Yama (the Hindu Lord of the Dead), I propose they should be considered the equivalent of near-death experience (NDE). To investigate this, I will examine a variety of textual sources from a historical point of view. The selected material is from three different periods and will be discussed in a chronological order to appreciate the changing of religious beliefs in South Asia. The first collection of literature belongs to the Vedic period and consists of mythological narratives from Rgveda, Atharvaveda, and the Upanisads. The second include the Mahabharata and Puranas (Post-Vedic period), and the third assortment are contemporary ethnographic accounts. A comparative analysis of these sources permits to acknowledge how near-death experiences in India have changed from a sacrificial culture into one primarily concerned with the concept of karma (action) and its social and otherworldly outcomes, that is reward and punishment.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectnear-death experienceen
dc.subjectYamaen
dc.subjectvisionsen
dc.subjectSouth Asiaen
dc.titleNear-death experience in Indian religions: Encountering Yamaen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMAen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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