Are parents showing pushy parenting traits on online discussion forums?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620961
Title:
Are parents showing pushy parenting traits on online discussion forums?
Authors:
Holland, Emily
Abstract:
More parents are turning to online discussion forums for security, advice, support, empowerment and to share their parenting experiences. This naturalistic setting is becoming more prominent form of data collection within psychological research, observing human behaviour in natural manner. Many parenting styles are widely acknowledged, but little research has been performed surrounding pushy parenting. Pushy parenting behaviours can be evident and associated within an educational context. Therefore, this study aims to explore online discussion forums for evidence of pushy parenting behavioural traits. Content analytical approaches were applied on a poplar parenting website Mumsnet. A coding scheme was devised from the existing literature and was applied to one hundred discussions from nine threads related to education where there was clear evidence of pushy parenting characteristics. 2x2 Chi-square tests were run to establish any significant relationships between the variables stated as the hypotheses. Findings suggest that there is a significant relationship between the gender of the child and pushy parenting, the orientation displayed towards the child and the child’s educator and whether the behaviour is considered in the child’s best interests and the reasons given making the behaviour justifiable.
Advisors:
Lloyd, Julian
Citation:
Holland, E. (2017). Are parents showing pushy parenting traits on online discussion forums? (Master's thesis). University of Chester, United Kingdom.
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620961
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorLloyd, Julianen
dc.contributor.authorHolland, Emilyen
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-16T11:24:16Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-16T11:24:16Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationHolland, E. (2017). Are parents showing pushy parenting traits on online discussion forums? (Master's thesis). University of Chester, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620961-
dc.description.abstractMore parents are turning to online discussion forums for security, advice, support, empowerment and to share their parenting experiences. This naturalistic setting is becoming more prominent form of data collection within psychological research, observing human behaviour in natural manner. Many parenting styles are widely acknowledged, but little research has been performed surrounding pushy parenting. Pushy parenting behaviours can be evident and associated within an educational context. Therefore, this study aims to explore online discussion forums for evidence of pushy parenting behavioural traits. Content analytical approaches were applied on a poplar parenting website Mumsnet. A coding scheme was devised from the existing literature and was applied to one hundred discussions from nine threads related to education where there was clear evidence of pushy parenting characteristics. 2x2 Chi-square tests were run to establish any significant relationships between the variables stated as the hypotheses. Findings suggest that there is a significant relationship between the gender of the child and pushy parenting, the orientation displayed towards the child and the child’s educator and whether the behaviour is considered in the child’s best interests and the reasons given making the behaviour justifiable.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.subjectParentingen
dc.subjectdiscussion forumsen
dc.titleAre parents showing pushy parenting traits on online discussion forums?en
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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