The MBA Student and CSR: A Case Study from a European Business School  

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620846
Title:
The MBA Student and CSR: A Case Study from a European Business School  
Authors:
Manning, Paul
Abstract:
Purpose The purpose of this chapter is to develop a deeper understanding of the CSR perspectives of MBA in the European context. The chapter will review literature from the US and Europe focused on business school ethics and the CSR. The chapter will then present the findings generated from research into MBA students’ ethics and CSR from a European business school research site. Methodology This was inductive research, and data was collected with qualitative semi-structured interviews. The research population was purposely selected from two cohorts of MBA students, one comprising P/T, the other F/T students. Findings The research confirmed that there are broad similarities between the US and Europe, in terms of a students’ experiences of business school scholarship and pedagogy. The research also confirmed however, that these European based students wanted a greater focus on CSR, for instance in terms of addressing the relationship between business and the environment, which students do not consider is adequately addressed in their programmes. Furthermore, and reflecting US experience, students reported at the completion of the MBA that they were conscious that they had become more focused on their individual ‘rational’ self-interest, with the goal of increasing their own material success. Not all of these students were content with this change, but they reported that it had been embedded within them, as a consequence of studying for an MBA. Social Implication US based research, and this example from the European context both point to the conclusion that there is dominant instrumental paradigm in HE business and management pedagogy. This paradigm needs to be challenged to restore society’s ethical and CSR expectations, and also to facilitate the moral education of more socially responsible MBA graduate managers. The research confirmed that students are very much in favour of CSR framed changes to the MBA programme Originality This chapter contributes to a developing research stream into MBA programmes and CSR in a European context.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Manning, P. (2018). The MBA Student and CSR: A Case Study of Attitudes from a European Business School. In Tench, R., Sun. W. & Jones, B. (Eds.), The Critical State of Corporate Social Responsibility in Europe, volume 12. London, United Kingdom: Emerald Publishing Limited.
Publisher:
Emerald Publishing Limited
Publication Date:
19-Jul-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620846
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9781787561502
Appears in Collections:
Chester Business School

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorManning, Paulen
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-31T16:03:51Z-
dc.date.available2018-01-31T16:03:51Z-
dc.date.issued2018-07-19-
dc.identifier.citationManning, P. (2018). The MBA Student and CSR: A Case Study of Attitudes from a European Business School. In Tench, R., Sun. W. & Jones, B. (Eds.), The Critical State of Corporate Social Responsibility in Europe, volume 12. London, United Kingdom: Emerald Publishing Limited.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781787561502-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620846-
dc.description.abstractPurpose The purpose of this chapter is to develop a deeper understanding of the CSR perspectives of MBA in the European context. The chapter will review literature from the US and Europe focused on business school ethics and the CSR. The chapter will then present the findings generated from research into MBA students’ ethics and CSR from a European business school research site. Methodology This was inductive research, and data was collected with qualitative semi-structured interviews. The research population was purposely selected from two cohorts of MBA students, one comprising P/T, the other F/T students. Findings The research confirmed that there are broad similarities between the US and Europe, in terms of a students’ experiences of business school scholarship and pedagogy. The research also confirmed however, that these European based students wanted a greater focus on CSR, for instance in terms of addressing the relationship between business and the environment, which students do not consider is adequately addressed in their programmes. Furthermore, and reflecting US experience, students reported at the completion of the MBA that they were conscious that they had become more focused on their individual ‘rational’ self-interest, with the goal of increasing their own material success. Not all of these students were content with this change, but they reported that it had been embedded within them, as a consequence of studying for an MBA. Social Implication US based research, and this example from the European context both point to the conclusion that there is dominant instrumental paradigm in HE business and management pedagogy. This paradigm needs to be challenged to restore society’s ethical and CSR expectations, and also to facilitate the moral education of more socially responsible MBA graduate managers. The research confirmed that students are very much in favour of CSR framed changes to the MBA programme Originality This chapter contributes to a developing research stream into MBA programmes and CSR in a European context.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmerald Publishing Limiteden
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectBusiness Ethics,,en
dc.subjectCSRen
dc.subjectMBA students,en
dc.subjectBusiness schoolsen
dc.titleThe MBA Student and CSR: A Case Study from a European Business School  en
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.date.accepted2017-12-01-
or.grant.openaccessNoen
rioxxterms.funderQRen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectinternally funded research, QR Grant, Manning, 2016-17en
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2218-07-19-
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