The garden as a laboratory: the role of domestic gardens as places of scientific exploration in the long 18th century

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620825
Title:
The garden as a laboratory: the role of domestic gardens as places of scientific exploration in the long 18th century
Authors:
Hickman, Clare ( 0000-0003-3356-5721 )
Abstract:
Eighteenth-century gardens have traditionally been viewed as spaces designed for leisure, and as representations of political status, power and taste. In contrast, this paper will explore the concept that gardens in this period could be seen as dynamic spaces where scientific experiment and medical practice could occur. Two examples have been explored in the pilot study which has led to this paper — the designed landscapes associated with John Hunter’s Earl’s Court residence, in London, and the garden at Edward Jenner’s house in Berkeley, Gloucestershire. Garden history methodologies have been implemented in order to consider the extent to which these domestic gardens can be viewed as experimental spaces.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Hickman, C. (2014). The garden as a laboratory: the role of domestic gardens as places of scientific exploration in the long 18th century. Post-Medieval Archaeology 48(1), 229–247. https://doi.org/10.1179/0079423614Z.00000000054
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Post-Medieval Archaeology
Publication Date:
24-Jun-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620825
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1179/0079423614Z.00000000054
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Post-Medieval Archaeology on 24/06/2014, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1179/0079423614Z.00000000054
EISSN:
1745-8137
Appears in Collections:
History and Archaeology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHickman, Clareen
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-26T16:15:59Z-
dc.date.available2018-01-26T16:15:59Z-
dc.date.issued2014-06-24-
dc.identifier.citationHickman, C. (2014). The garden as a laboratory: the role of domestic gardens as places of scientific exploration in the long 18th century. Post-Medieval Archaeology 48(1), 229–247. https://doi.org/10.1179/0079423614Z.00000000054en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620825-
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Post-Medieval Archaeology on 24/06/2014, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1179/0079423614Z.00000000054en
dc.description.abstractEighteenth-century gardens have traditionally been viewed as spaces designed for leisure, and as representations of political status, power and taste. In contrast, this paper will explore the concept that gardens in this period could be seen as dynamic spaces where scientific experiment and medical practice could occur. Two examples have been explored in the pilot study which has led to this paper — the designed landscapes associated with John Hunter’s Earl’s Court residence, in London, and the garden at Edward Jenner’s house in Berkeley, Gloucestershire. Garden history methodologies have been implemented in order to consider the extent to which these domestic gardens can be viewed as experimental spaces.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1179/0079423614Z.00000000054en
dc.subjectGarden Historyen
dc.subjectMedicineen
dc.subjectHistory of Scienceen
dc.subjectEighteenth centuryen
dc.titleThe garden as a laboratory: the role of domestic gardens as places of scientific exploration in the long 18th centuryen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1745-8137-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalPost-Medieval Archaeologyen
dc.date.accepted2014-03-01-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderWellcome Trusten
rioxxterms.identifier.projectWellcome Trust at King's College Londonen
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2014-06-24-
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