Combustion of fuel blends containing digestate pyrolysis oil in a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620792
Title:
Combustion of fuel blends containing digestate pyrolysis oil in a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine
Authors:
Hossain, A. K.; Serrano, C.; Brammer, John G.; Omran, A.; Ahmed, F.; Smith, D. I.; Davies, P. A.
Abstract:
Digestate from the anaerobic digestion conversion process is widely used as a farm land fertiliser. This study proposes an alternative use as a source of energy. Dried digestate was pyrolysed and the resulting oil was blended with waste cooking oil and butanol (10, 20 and 30 vol.%). The physical and chemical properties of the pyrolysis oil blends were measured and compared with pure fossil diesel and waste cooking oil. The blends were tested in a multi-cylinder indirect injection compression ignition engine. Engine combustion, exhaust gas emissions and performance parameters were measured and compared with pure fossil diesel operation. The ASTM copper corrosion values for 20% and 30% pyrolysis blends were 2c, compared to 1b for fossil diesel. The kinematic viscosities of the blends at 40 C were 5–7 times higher than that of fossil diesel. Digested pyrolysis oil blends produced lower in-cylinder peak pressures than fossil diesel and waste cooking oil operation. The maximum heat release rates of the blends were approximately 8% higher than with fossil diesel. The ignition delay periods of the blends were higher; pyrolysis oil blends started to combust late and once combustion started burnt quicker than fossil diesel. The total burning duration of the 20% and 30% blends were decreased by 12% and 3% compared to fossil diesel. At full engine load, the brake thermal efficiencies of the blends were decreased by about 3–7% when compared to fossil diesel. The pyrolysis blends gave lower smoke levels; at full engine load, smoke level of the 20% blend was 44% lower than fossil diesel. In comparison to fossil diesel and at full load, the brake specific fuel consumption (wt.) of the 30% and 20% blends were approximately 32% and 15% higher. At full engine load, the CO emission of the 20% and 30% blends were decreased by 39% and 66% with respect to the fossil diesel. Blends CO2 emissions were similar to that of fossil diesel; at full engine load, 30% blend produced approximately 5% higher CO2 emission than fossil diesel. The study concludes that on the basis of short term engine experiment up to 30% blend of pyrolysis oil from digestate of arable crops can be used in a compression ignition engine.
Affiliation:
Aston University
Citation:
Hossain, A. K., et al. (2016). Combustion of fuel blends containing digestate pyrolysis oil in a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine. Fuel, 171, 18-28. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fuel.2015.12.012
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Fuel
Publication Date:
23-Dec-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620792
DOI:
10.1016/j.fuel.2015.12.012
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S001623611501265X?via%3Dihub
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0016-2361
EISSN:
1873-7153
Appears in Collections:
Chemical Engineering

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHossain, A. K.en
dc.contributor.authorSerrano, C.en
dc.contributor.authorBrammer, John G.en
dc.contributor.authorOmran, A.en
dc.contributor.authorAhmed, F.en
dc.contributor.authorSmith, D. I.en
dc.contributor.authorDavies, P. A.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-05T10:50:42Z-
dc.date.available2018-01-05T10:50:42Z-
dc.date.issued2015-12-23-
dc.identifier.citationHossain, A. K., et al. (2016). Combustion of fuel blends containing digestate pyrolysis oil in a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine. Fuel, 171, 18-28. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fuel.2015.12.012en
dc.identifier.issn0016-2361-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.fuel.2015.12.012-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620792-
dc.description.abstractDigestate from the anaerobic digestion conversion process is widely used as a farm land fertiliser. This study proposes an alternative use as a source of energy. Dried digestate was pyrolysed and the resulting oil was blended with waste cooking oil and butanol (10, 20 and 30 vol.%). The physical and chemical properties of the pyrolysis oil blends were measured and compared with pure fossil diesel and waste cooking oil. The blends were tested in a multi-cylinder indirect injection compression ignition engine. Engine combustion, exhaust gas emissions and performance parameters were measured and compared with pure fossil diesel operation. The ASTM copper corrosion values for 20% and 30% pyrolysis blends were 2c, compared to 1b for fossil diesel. The kinematic viscosities of the blends at 40 C were 5–7 times higher than that of fossil diesel. Digested pyrolysis oil blends produced lower in-cylinder peak pressures than fossil diesel and waste cooking oil operation. The maximum heat release rates of the blends were approximately 8% higher than with fossil diesel. The ignition delay periods of the blends were higher; pyrolysis oil blends started to combust late and once combustion started burnt quicker than fossil diesel. The total burning duration of the 20% and 30% blends were decreased by 12% and 3% compared to fossil diesel. At full engine load, the brake thermal efficiencies of the blends were decreased by about 3–7% when compared to fossil diesel. The pyrolysis blends gave lower smoke levels; at full engine load, smoke level of the 20% blend was 44% lower than fossil diesel. In comparison to fossil diesel and at full load, the brake specific fuel consumption (wt.) of the 30% and 20% blends were approximately 32% and 15% higher. At full engine load, the CO emission of the 20% and 30% blends were decreased by 39% and 66% with respect to the fossil diesel. Blends CO2 emissions were similar to that of fossil diesel; at full engine load, 30% blend produced approximately 5% higher CO2 emission than fossil diesel. The study concludes that on the basis of short term engine experiment up to 30% blend of pyrolysis oil from digestate of arable crops can be used in a compression ignition engine.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S001623611501265X?via%3Dihuben
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectCI engineen
dc.subjectIntermediate pyrolysisen
dc.titleCombustion of fuel blends containing digestate pyrolysis oil in a multi-cylinder compression ignition engineen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1873-7153-
dc.contributor.departmentAston Universityen
dc.identifier.journalFuelen
dc.date.accepted2015-12-10-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderEPSRCen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectnot knownen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-12-23-
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in ChesterRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.