I Scream Therefore I Fan? Music Audiences and Affective Citizenship

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620780
Title:
I Scream Therefore I Fan? Music Audiences and Affective Citizenship
Authors:
Duffett, Mark
Abstract:
Screaming has long been regarded, in the mainstream media, as the sine qua non of celebrity fandom. Pop music represents one of the obvious places where it is heard in the public sphere. Not all fans scream, but those who do are not doubted as fans since they express their position on the “knowing field” of fandom in an emotional way. As scholars, however, we rarely if ever discuss exclamations made by fans, instead focusing on their creativity, autonomy and collective intelligence. Taking popular music as its focus, what follows will develop in two sections. The first considers why screaming has been framed as a problematic activity. The second argues that fan screaming can alternatively be understood as a form of enunciative productivity, an indicator of totemic interest, and a mode of affective citizenship.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Duffett, M. (2017). I Scream Therefore I Fan? Music Audiences and Affective Citizenship. In J. Gray, C. Sandvoss, C. L. Harrington (Eds.), Fandom: Identities and Communities in a Mediated World (2nd ed., pp. 143-156). New York, NY: New York University Press.
Publisher:
New York University Press
Publication Date:
28-Aug-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620780
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Description:
Academic book chapter in prestigious, international volume, on the topic in popular music culture: fan screaming.
ISBN:
9781479812769
Appears in Collections:
Media

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDuffett, Marken
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-02T15:43:18Z-
dc.date.available2018-01-02T15:43:18Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-28-
dc.identifier.citationDuffett, M. (2017). I Scream Therefore I Fan? Music Audiences and Affective Citizenship. In J. Gray, C. Sandvoss, C. L. Harrington (Eds.), Fandom: Identities and Communities in a Mediated World (2nd ed., pp. 143-156). New York, NY: New York University Press.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781479812769-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620780-
dc.descriptionAcademic book chapter in prestigious, international volume, on the topic in popular music culture: fan screaming.en
dc.description.abstractScreaming has long been regarded, in the mainstream media, as the sine qua non of celebrity fandom. Pop music represents one of the obvious places where it is heard in the public sphere. Not all fans scream, but those who do are not doubted as fans since they express their position on the “knowing field” of fandom in an emotional way. As scholars, however, we rarely if ever discuss exclamations made by fans, instead focusing on their creativity, autonomy and collective intelligence. Taking popular music as its focus, what follows will develop in two sections. The first considers why screaming has been framed as a problematic activity. The second argues that fan screaming can alternatively be understood as a form of enunciative productivity, an indicator of totemic interest, and a mode of affective citizenship.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNew York University Pressen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectMusic fandomen
dc.subjectPopular musicen
dc.subjectAffecten
dc.subjectPopular cultureen
dc.titleI Scream Therefore I Fan? Music Audiences and Affective Citizenshipen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.date.accepted2017-05-20-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2217-08-28-
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