‘When the reservoir comes’: Drowned Villages, Community and Nostalgia in Contemporary British Fiction

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620762
Title:
‘When the reservoir comes’: Drowned Villages, Community and Nostalgia in Contemporary British Fiction
Authors:
Pollard, Eileen J.
Abstract:
A ‘drowned’ or flooded village describes the destruction of a settlement or community to make way for a reservoir; as a practice, it most commonly occurred in Britain during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries when the need for fresh water in growing industrial cities was at its height. This essay will explore three different representations of the ‘drowned village’ in contemporary British fiction. Reginald Hill’s On Beulah Height (1992), Hilary Mantel’s short story ‘The Clean Slate’ (2001) and Sarah Hall’s Haweswater (2002) will all be considered in terms of how the drowned village is presented and described, and what this representation suggests about the ways nostalgia, ritual and ruin impact upon notions of community and place.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Pollard, E. (2017). 'When the reservoir comes': Drowned villages, community and nostalgia in contemporary British fiction. C21 Literature: Journal of 21st-century writings, 5(3), 1-21. http://doi.org/10.16995/c21.9
Publisher:
Open Library of Humanities
Journal:
C21 Literature: Journal of 21st-Century Writings
Publication Date:
8-Dec-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620762
DOI:
10.16995/c21.9
Additional Links:
https://c21.openlibhums.org/articles/10.16995/c21.9/; https://c21.ubiquitypress.com/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
EISSN:
2045-5224
Appears in Collections:
English

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPollard, Eileen J.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-12T11:39:49Z-
dc.date.available2017-12-12T11:39:49Z-
dc.date.issued2017-12-08-
dc.identifier.citationPollard, E. (2017). 'When the reservoir comes': Drowned villages, community and nostalgia in contemporary British fiction. C21 Literature: Journal of 21st-century writings, 5(3), 1-21. http://doi.org/10.16995/c21.9en
dc.identifier.doi10.16995/c21.9-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620762-
dc.description.abstractA ‘drowned’ or flooded village describes the destruction of a settlement or community to make way for a reservoir; as a practice, it most commonly occurred in Britain during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries when the need for fresh water in growing industrial cities was at its height. This essay will explore three different representations of the ‘drowned village’ in contemporary British fiction. Reginald Hill’s On Beulah Height (1992), Hilary Mantel’s short story ‘The Clean Slate’ (2001) and Sarah Hall’s Haweswater (2002) will all be considered in terms of how the drowned village is presented and described, and what this representation suggests about the ways nostalgia, ritual and ruin impact upon notions of community and place.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOpen Library of Humanitiesen
dc.relation.urlhttps://c21.openlibhums.org/articles/10.16995/c21.9/en
dc.relation.urlhttps://c21.ubiquitypress.com/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectDrowned Villageen
dc.subjectReginald Hillen
dc.subjectcommunityen
dc.subjectHilary Mantelen
dc.subjectSarah Hallen
dc.title‘When the reservoir comes’: Drowned Villages, Community and Nostalgia in Contemporary British Fictionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2045-5224-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalC21 Literature: Journal of 21st-Century Writingsen
dc.date.accepted2017-12-08-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-12-08-
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