Quantification of the physical and physiological load of a boxing-specific simulation protocol

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620706
Title:
Quantification of the physical and physiological load of a boxing-specific simulation protocol
Authors:
Thomson, Edward; Lamb, Kevin L.
Abstract:
The aim of the study was to determine the physical and physiological responses to simulated amateur boxing of 3 × 3-min rounds. Using an externally valid technical and ambulatory demand, 28 amateur boxers (mean ± SD; age 22.4 ± 3.5 years, body mass 67.7 ± 10.1 kg, stature 171 ± 9 cm) completed the protocol following familiarisation. The physiological load was determined continuously via collection of mean (HRmean) and peak (HRpeak) heart rate, breath-by-breath oxygen uptake ( ̇V O2), aerobic energy expenditure (EEaer), excess carbon dioxide production (CO2excess), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and post-performance blood lactate. Physical performance was quantified as the acceleration delivered to the target by punches. HRmean and HRpeak were found to exceed 165 and 178 b min−1, absolute ̇V O2 > 124.6 ml kg−1, EEaer > 30.7 kcal min−1 and acceleration via 78 punches >2697 g during each round. Mean blood lactate (4.6 mmol l−1) and CO2excess (438.7 ml min−1) were higher than typical resting values reflecting a notable anaerobic contribution. RPEs reinforced the intensity of exercise was strenuous (>6–8). For all measures, there were typical increases (p < 0.05; moderate ES) across rounds. Accordingly, boxers might consider high-intensity (>90% ̇V O2max) interval training in anticipation such exercise yields improvements in aerobic conditioning. Moreover, the current simulation protocol – the boxing conditioning and fitness test – could be used as a form of training per se and as a means to monitor intervention-based changes in aspects of boxing-related physiology and performance. 1.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Thomson, E., & Lamb, K. L. (2017). Quantification of the physical and physiological load of a boxing-specific simulation protocol. International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport, 17(1-2), 136-148. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/24748668.2017.1304048
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport
Publication Date:
24-Mar-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620706
DOI:
10.1080/24748668.2017.1304048
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/24748668.2017.1304048
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport on 24/03/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/24748668.2017.1304048
EISSN:
1474-8185
Appears in Collections:
Sport and Exercise Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThomson, Edwarden
dc.contributor.authorLamb, Kevin L.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-03T14:43:17Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-03T14:43:17Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-24-
dc.identifier.citationThomson, E., & Lamb, K. L. (2017). Quantification of the physical and physiological load of a boxing-specific simulation protocol. International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport, 17(1-2), 136-148. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/24748668.2017.1304048en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/24748668.2017.1304048-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620706-
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport on 24/03/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/24748668.2017.1304048en
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the study was to determine the physical and physiological responses to simulated amateur boxing of 3 × 3-min rounds. Using an externally valid technical and ambulatory demand, 28 amateur boxers (mean ± SD; age 22.4 ± 3.5 years, body mass 67.7 ± 10.1 kg, stature 171 ± 9 cm) completed the protocol following familiarisation. The physiological load was determined continuously via collection of mean (HRmean) and peak (HRpeak) heart rate, breath-by-breath oxygen uptake ( ̇V O2), aerobic energy expenditure (EEaer), excess carbon dioxide production (CO2excess), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and post-performance blood lactate. Physical performance was quantified as the acceleration delivered to the target by punches. HRmean and HRpeak were found to exceed 165 and 178 b min−1, absolute ̇V O2 > 124.6 ml kg−1, EEaer > 30.7 kcal min−1 and acceleration via 78 punches >2697 g during each round. Mean blood lactate (4.6 mmol l−1) and CO2excess (438.7 ml min−1) were higher than typical resting values reflecting a notable anaerobic contribution. RPEs reinforced the intensity of exercise was strenuous (>6–8). For all measures, there were typical increases (p < 0.05; moderate ES) across rounds. Accordingly, boxers might consider high-intensity (>90% ̇V O2max) interval training in anticipation such exercise yields improvements in aerobic conditioning. Moreover, the current simulation protocol – the boxing conditioning and fitness test – could be used as a form of training per se and as a means to monitor intervention-based changes in aspects of boxing-related physiology and performance. 1.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/24748668.2017.1304048en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectCombat sportsen
dc.subjectBoxingen
dc.subjectSimulationen
dc.subjectValidityen
dc.titleQuantification of the physical and physiological load of a boxing-specific simulation protocolen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1474-8185-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Performance Analysis in Sporten
dc.date.accepted2017-03-02-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-09-24-
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