Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620703
Title:
Effort Perception
Authors:
Lamb, Kevin L.; Eston, Roger; Parfitt, Gaynor
Abstract:
Research addressing children's perceptions of exercise effort (their ‘perceived exertion’) has appeared steadily in the scientific literature over the last 30 years. Accepting that the established Borg adult rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale was not appropriate for children, investigators set about developing child-specific scales which employed numbers, words and/or images that were more familiar and understandable. Numerous studies have examined the validity and reliability of such scales as the CERT, PCERT and OMNI amongst children aged 5 to 16, across different modes of exercise (cycling, running, stepping, resistance exercise), protocols (intermittent vs. continuous, incremental vs. non-incremental) and paradigms (estimation vs. production). Such laboratory-based research has enabled the general conclusion that children can, especially with practice, use effort perception scales to differentiate between exercise intensity levels, and to self-regulate their exercise output to match various levels indicated on them. However, inconsistencies in the methodological approaches adopted diminish the certainty of some of the interpretations made by researchers. In addition, though often mentioned, the would-be application of effort perception in physical education and activity/health promotion contexts has been relatively ignored. Accordingly, the scope for research in this applied domain is now considerable.
Affiliation:
University of Chester; University of South Australia
Citation:
Lamb, K. L., Eston, R. G., & Parfitt, G. (2017). Effort perception. In N. Armstrong, & W. Van Mechelen (Eds.), Oxford textbook of children's sport and exercise medicine (3rd ed). Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication Date:
27-Apr-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620703
Additional Links:
https://global.oup.com/academic/product/oxford-textbook-of-childrens-sport-and-exercise-medicine-9780198757672?q=Paediatric%20exercise&lang=en&cc=gb
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9780198757672
Appears in Collections:
Sport and Exercise Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLamb, Kevin L.en
dc.contributor.authorEston, Rogeren
dc.contributor.authorParfitt, Gaynoren
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-03T14:27:10Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-03T14:27:10Z-
dc.date.issued2017-04-27-
dc.identifier.citationLamb, K. L., Eston, R. G., & Parfitt, G. (2017). Effort perception. In N. Armstrong, & W. Van Mechelen (Eds.), Oxford textbook of children's sport and exercise medicine (3rd ed). Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.en
dc.identifier.isbn9780198757672-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620703-
dc.description.abstractResearch addressing children's perceptions of exercise effort (their ‘perceived exertion’) has appeared steadily in the scientific literature over the last 30 years. Accepting that the established Borg adult rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale was not appropriate for children, investigators set about developing child-specific scales which employed numbers, words and/or images that were more familiar and understandable. Numerous studies have examined the validity and reliability of such scales as the CERT, PCERT and OMNI amongst children aged 5 to 16, across different modes of exercise (cycling, running, stepping, resistance exercise), protocols (intermittent vs. continuous, incremental vs. non-incremental) and paradigms (estimation vs. production). Such laboratory-based research has enabled the general conclusion that children can, especially with practice, use effort perception scales to differentiate between exercise intensity levels, and to self-regulate their exercise output to match various levels indicated on them. However, inconsistencies in the methodological approaches adopted diminish the certainty of some of the interpretations made by researchers. In addition, though often mentioned, the would-be application of effort perception in physical education and activity/health promotion contexts has been relatively ignored. Accordingly, the scope for research in this applied domain is now considerable.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://global.oup.com/academic/product/oxford-textbook-of-childrens-sport-and-exercise-medicine-9780198757672?q=Paediatric%20exercise&lang=en&cc=gben
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectperceived exertionen
dc.subjectchild-specific scalesen
dc.subjectCERTen
dc.subjectOMNIen
dc.titleEffort Perceptionen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; University of South Australiaen
dc.date.accepted2016-11-23-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2217-04-27-
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