The Smiling Abbot: Rediscovering a Unique Medieval Effigial Slab

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620690
Title:
The Smiling Abbot: Rediscovering a Unique Medieval Effigial Slab
Authors:
Williams, Howard ( 0000-0003-3510-6852 ) ; Smith, Gillian; Crane, David; Watson, Aaron
Abstract:
The article reports on a newly re-discovered fragment of a recumbent effigial slab commemorating Abbot Hywel (‘Howel’), most likely an abbot of the Cistercian house of Valle Crucis, near Llangollen (Denbighs.). The slab was probably carved very early in the fourteenth century, and could have covered the abbot’s burial place. The stone was dislocated and fragmented at an unknown point in the abbey’s history, and most likely removed from the site during the nineteenth-century clearance of the abbey ruins. It was briefly reported on in 1895 and has been lost to scholarship subsequently. If indeed from Valle Crucis, the stone is the only known effigial slab commemorating a Cistercian abbot from Wales, and a rare example from Britain. Given that few similar Cistercian abbatial monuments have been identified from elsewhere, the ‘Smiling Abbot’, although only a fragment, is a significant addition to the known corpus of later medieval mortuary monuments. The article discusses the provenance, dating, identification and significance of the monument, including the abbot’s distinctive smile. The stone sheds new light on mortuary and commemorative practice at Valle Crucis Abbey in the early fourteenth century.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Williams, H., Smith, G., Crane, D., & Watson, A. (2017). The Smiling Abbot: Rediscovering a Unique Medieval Effigial Slab. Archaeological Journal. DOI: 10.1080/00665983.2017.13366705
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Archaeological Journal
Publication Date:
6-Nov-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620690
DOI:
10.1080/00665983.2017.13366705
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/raij20/current
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Archaeological Journal on 06/11/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00665983.2017.1366705
EISSN:
2373-2288
Appears in Collections:
History and Archaeology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Howarden
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Gillianen
dc.contributor.authorCrane, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Aaronen
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-26T13:07:23Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-26T13:07:23Z-
dc.date.issued2017-11-06-
dc.identifier.citationWilliams, H., Smith, G., Crane, D., & Watson, A. (2017). The Smiling Abbot: Rediscovering a Unique Medieval Effigial Slab. Archaeological Journal. DOI: 10.1080/00665983.2017.13366705en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00665983.2017.13366705-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620690-
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Archaeological Journal on 06/11/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00665983.2017.1366705en
dc.description.abstractThe article reports on a newly re-discovered fragment of a recumbent effigial slab commemorating Abbot Hywel (‘Howel’), most likely an abbot of the Cistercian house of Valle Crucis, near Llangollen (Denbighs.). The slab was probably carved very early in the fourteenth century, and could have covered the abbot’s burial place. The stone was dislocated and fragmented at an unknown point in the abbey’s history, and most likely removed from the site during the nineteenth-century clearance of the abbey ruins. It was briefly reported on in 1895 and has been lost to scholarship subsequently. If indeed from Valle Crucis, the stone is the only known effigial slab commemorating a Cistercian abbot from Wales, and a rare example from Britain. Given that few similar Cistercian abbatial monuments have been identified from elsewhere, the ‘Smiling Abbot’, although only a fragment, is a significant addition to the known corpus of later medieval mortuary monuments. The article discusses the provenance, dating, identification and significance of the monument, including the abbot’s distinctive smile. The stone sheds new light on mortuary and commemorative practice at Valle Crucis Abbey in the early fourteenth century.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/toc/raij20/currenten
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectCistercianen
dc.subjectGrave-slaben
dc.subjectMedievalen
dc.subjectAbboten
dc.subjectValle Crucisen
dc.subjectEffigial slaben
dc.titleThe Smiling Abbot: Rediscovering a Unique Medieval Effigial Slaben
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2373-2288-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalArchaeological Journalen
dc.date.accepted2017-09-28-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-05-06-
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