Social class and the emergent organised sporting habits of primary-aged children

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620688
Title:
Social class and the emergent organised sporting habits of primary-aged children
Authors:
Wheeler, Sharon; Green, Ken; Thurston, Miranda
Abstract:
This paper reports on the patterns of participation in organised sports of youngsters coming towards the end of primary school, with a view to identifying emergent sporting habits in relation to social class gradients. The data for the study were generated via 90 semi-structured interviews with parents and children from 62 families. The data revealed differences in organised activity participation (both at and beyond school) between an ‘under-class’ and combined middle-class groups of children, as well as within-class gradients among the middle-class sub-groups. There were, for example, substantial differences between the under-class group and the combined middle-class group in terms of both the average number of bouts of organised sport participation and the repertoire or variety of sports engaged with. In effect, the mid- and upper-middle-class children were already sporting and cultural omnivores by the final years of primary schooling. We conclude that while the primary school organised sporting ‘offer’ may be neither a sufficient nor even a necessary contribution to the emerging sporting habits of mid- and upper-middle-class children, for under-class children it is likely to be necessary even though it may still prove, in the longer run, insufficient.
Affiliation:
Edge Hill University; University of Chester; Innland University Norway
Citation:
Wheeler, S., Green, K., & Thurston (2017). Social class and the emergent organised sporting habits of primary-aged children. European Physical Education Review. DOI: 10.1177/1356336X17706092
Publisher:
Sage
Journal:
European Physical Education Review
Publication Date:
15-May-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620688
DOI:
10.1177/1356336X17706092
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Wheeler, S., Green, K., & Thurston (2017). Social class and the emergent organised sporting habits of primary-aged children. European Physical Education Review. DOI: 10.1177/1356336X17706092. Copyright © 2017 (SAGE). Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications.
EISSN:
1741-2749
Appears in Collections:
Sport and Exercise Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWheeler, Sharonen
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Kenen
dc.contributor.authorThurston, Mirandaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-26T12:32:32Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-26T12:32:32Z-
dc.date.issued2017-05-15-
dc.identifier.citationWheeler, S., Green, K., & Thurston (2017). Social class and the emergent organised sporting habits of primary-aged children. European Physical Education Review. DOI: 10.1177/1356336X17706092en
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1356336X17706092-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620688-
dc.descriptionWheeler, S., Green, K., & Thurston (2017). Social class and the emergent organised sporting habits of primary-aged children. European Physical Education Review. DOI: 10.1177/1356336X17706092. Copyright © 2017 (SAGE). Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications.-
dc.description.abstractThis paper reports on the patterns of participation in organised sports of youngsters coming towards the end of primary school, with a view to identifying emergent sporting habits in relation to social class gradients. The data for the study were generated via 90 semi-structured interviews with parents and children from 62 families. The data revealed differences in organised activity participation (both at and beyond school) between an ‘under-class’ and combined middle-class groups of children, as well as within-class gradients among the middle-class sub-groups. There were, for example, substantial differences between the under-class group and the combined middle-class group in terms of both the average number of bouts of organised sport participation and the repertoire or variety of sports engaged with. In effect, the mid- and upper-middle-class children were already sporting and cultural omnivores by the final years of primary schooling. We conclude that while the primary school organised sporting ‘offer’ may be neither a sufficient nor even a necessary contribution to the emerging sporting habits of mid- and upper-middle-class children, for under-class children it is likely to be necessary even though it may still prove, in the longer run, insufficient.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.subjectPrimary schoolen
dc.titleSocial class and the emergent organised sporting habits of primary-aged childrenen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1741-2749-
dc.contributor.departmentEdge Hill University; University of Chester; Innland University Norwayen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Physical Education Reviewen
dc.date.accepted2017-05-02-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
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