Comparing time use in individuals at different stages of psychosis and a non-clinical comparison group

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620662
Title:
Comparing time use in individuals at different stages of psychosis and a non-clinical comparison group
Authors:
Hodgekins, Jo; French, Paul; Birchwood, Max; Mugford, Miranda; Christopher, Rose; Marshall, Max; Everard, Linda; Lester, Helen; Jones, Peter; Amos, Tim; Singh, Swaran; Sharma, Vimal; Morrison, Anthony P.; Fowler, David
Abstract:
Social functioning difficulties are a common and disabling feature of psychosis and have also been identified in the prodromal phase. However, debate exists about how such difficulties should be defined and measured. Time spent in structured activity has previously been linked to increased psychological wellbeing in non-clinical samples and may provide a useful way of assessing social functioning in clinical settings. The current study compared weekly hours in structured activity, assessed with the Time Use Survey, in three clinical groups at different stages of psychosis: individuals with at-risk mental states (N = 199), individuals with first-episode psychosis (N = 878), and individuals with delayed social recovery following the remission of psychotic symptoms (N = 77). Time use in the three clinical groups was also compared with norms from an age-matched non-clinical group (N = 5686) recruited for the Office for National Statistics UK 2000 Time Use Survey. Cut-off scores for defining social disability and recovery were examined. All three clinical groups spent significantly fewer hours per week in structured activity than individuals in the non-clinical group. Reduced activity levels were observed before the onset of psychosis in individuals with at-risk mental states. Additional reductions in activity were observed in the first-episode psychosis and delayed recovery groups compared to the at-risk mental state group. Assessing time spent in structured activity provides a useful way to assess social disability and recovery across the spectrum of psychosis.
Affiliation:
University of East Anglia; University of Manchester; University of Warwick; Birmingham and Solihull NHS Mental Health Foundation Trust; University of Birmingham; University of Cambridge; University of Bristol; University of Chester; University of Sussex
Citation:
Hodgekins, J., et al. (2014). Comparing time use in individuals at different stages of psychosis and a non-clinical comparison group. Schizophrenia Research, 161(2-3), 188-93. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2014.12.011
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Schizophrenia Research
Publication Date:
23-Dec-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620662
DOI:
10.1016/j.schres.2014.12.011
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S092099641400721X?via%3Dihub
Type:
Article
Language:
en
EISSN:
1573-2509
Appears in Collections:
Health and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHodgekins, Joen
dc.contributor.authorFrench, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorBirchwood, Maxen
dc.contributor.authorMugford, Mirandaen
dc.contributor.authorChristopher, Roseen
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, Maxen
dc.contributor.authorEverard, Lindaen
dc.contributor.authorLester, Helenen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Peteren
dc.contributor.authorAmos, Timen
dc.contributor.authorSingh, Swaranen
dc.contributor.authorSharma, Vimalen
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, Anthony P.en
dc.contributor.authorFowler, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-19T13:00:54Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-19T13:00:54Z-
dc.date.issued2014-12-23-
dc.identifier.citationHodgekins, J., et al. (2014). Comparing time use in individuals at different stages of psychosis and a non-clinical comparison group. Schizophrenia Research, 161(2-3), 188-93. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2014.12.011en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.schres.2014.12.011-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620662-
dc.description.abstractSocial functioning difficulties are a common and disabling feature of psychosis and have also been identified in the prodromal phase. However, debate exists about how such difficulties should be defined and measured. Time spent in structured activity has previously been linked to increased psychological wellbeing in non-clinical samples and may provide a useful way of assessing social functioning in clinical settings. The current study compared weekly hours in structured activity, assessed with the Time Use Survey, in three clinical groups at different stages of psychosis: individuals with at-risk mental states (N = 199), individuals with first-episode psychosis (N = 878), and individuals with delayed social recovery following the remission of psychotic symptoms (N = 77). Time use in the three clinical groups was also compared with norms from an age-matched non-clinical group (N = 5686) recruited for the Office for National Statistics UK 2000 Time Use Survey. Cut-off scores for defining social disability and recovery were examined. All three clinical groups spent significantly fewer hours per week in structured activity than individuals in the non-clinical group. Reduced activity levels were observed before the onset of psychosis in individuals with at-risk mental states. Additional reductions in activity were observed in the first-episode psychosis and delayed recovery groups compared to the at-risk mental state group. Assessing time spent in structured activity provides a useful way to assess social disability and recovery across the spectrum of psychosis.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S092099641400721X?via%3Dihuben
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectPsychosisen
dc.subjectTime useen
dc.subjectSocial functioningen
dc.subjectRecoveryen
dc.subjectAt-risk mental stateen
dc.titleComparing time use in individuals at different stages of psychosis and a non-clinical comparison groupen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1573-2509-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of East Anglia; University of Manchester; University of Warwick; Birmingham and Solihull NHS Mental Health Foundation Trust; University of Birmingham; University of Cambridge; University of Bristol; University of Chester; University of Sussexen
dc.identifier.journalSchizophrenia Researchen
dc.date.accepted2015-12-06-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderDepartment of Health (National EDEN Study) and the Medical Research Council (ISREP and EDIE-II).en
rioxxterms.identifier.projectEDENen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-12-23-
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