The Moral Economy of the Irish Hotel From the Union to the Famine

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620638
Title:
The Moral Economy of the Irish Hotel From the Union to the Famine
Authors:
Fegan, Melissa ( 0000-0002-6015-6686 )
Abstract:
This chapter examines the peculiar characteristics of the Irish hotel in the period between the Act of Union and the Great Famine, when tourism was newly established in Ireland. The ‘moral economy’ of the inn or hotel was perceived as an extrapolation of that of the estate, or of Ireland itself. Viewed by many guests as primitive, lacking the neatness, cleanliness, and order they expected in British hotels, the Irish hotel functioned with double responsibilities: to the comfort of their guests, but also to the weal of the local community, providing work, relief, and begging opportunities for the poorest.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Fegan, M. (2018). The Moral Economy of the Irish Hotel From the Union to the Famine. In Elbert, M. M. & Schmid, S. (eds.). Anglo-American Travelers and the Hotel Experience in Nineteenth-Century Literature. Routledge.
Publisher:
Routledge
Publication Date:
2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620638
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9781138675902
Appears in Collections:
English

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFegan, Melissaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-28T11:22:20Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-28T11:22:20Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationFegan, M. (2018). The Moral Economy of the Irish Hotel From the Union to the Famine. In Elbert, M. M. & Schmid, S. (eds.). Anglo-American Travelers and the Hotel Experience in Nineteenth-Century Literature. Routledge.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781138675902-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620638-
dc.description.abstractThis chapter examines the peculiar characteristics of the Irish hotel in the period between the Act of Union and the Great Famine, when tourism was newly established in Ireland. The ‘moral economy’ of the inn or hotel was perceived as an extrapolation of that of the estate, or of Ireland itself. Viewed by many guests as primitive, lacking the neatness, cleanliness, and order they expected in British hotels, the Irish hotel functioned with double responsibilities: to the comfort of their guests, but also to the weal of the local community, providing work, relief, and begging opportunities for the poorest.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectIrish literatureen
dc.subjecttravel literatureen
dc.subjecttourism researchen
dc.subjectnineteenth-century literatureen
dc.titleThe Moral Economy of the Irish Hotel From the Union to the Famineen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.date.accepted2017-09-14-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2217-08-30-
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in ChesterRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.