History, Globalization and The Human Subject in The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620637
Title:
History, Globalization and The Human Subject in The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet
Authors:
Stephenson, William
Abstract:
Jacob de Zoet and Aibagawa Orito, the protagonists of The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet, think and act like people of their time and place. Mitchell's novel thus falls into step with Georg Lukács's classic Marxist account of historical fiction as a genre that 'endeavours to portray the struggles and antagonisms of history by means of characters who, in their psychology and destiny, always represent social trends and historical forces'. The gestures, hints and fantasies that characterize Jacob's and Orito's unconsummated affair suggest in microcosm the state of world historical relationships in the novel, where the expansionist West and isolationist Japan imagine one another, creating spectres of race and nation. The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet alludes to its own time by advancing Mitchell's project, begun in Ghostwritten, of engagement with the contemporary globalized world where civilizations clash in a state of mutual ignorance. Caroline Edwards has shown how Ghostwritten and Cloud Atlas offer 'a non-contemporaneous narrative present' of the sort described by Jacques Derrida in Specters of Marx. Taking its cue from Edwards's point that this disjointed present exists in Mitchell's fiction to defamiliarize and critically examine 'the globalized capitalist world of his readership', this essay will study the contemporary cultural conflicts played out in the historical setting of Mitchell's Japan.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Stephenson, W. (2018-forthcoming). History, Globalization and the Human Subject in The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet. In Knepper, W. & Hopf, C. (eds.). David Mitchell: Contemporary Critical Perspectives. London, United Kingdom: Bloomsbury.
Publisher:
Bloomsbury Academic
Publication Date:
22-Mar-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620637
Additional Links:
https://bloomsbury.com/uk/david-mitchell-9781474262101/
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9781474262101
Appears in Collections:
English

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStephenson, Williamen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-28T11:15:51Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-28T11:15:51Z-
dc.date.issued2018-03-22-
dc.identifier.citationStephenson, W. (2018-forthcoming). History, Globalization and the Human Subject in The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet. In Knepper, W. & Hopf, C. (eds.). David Mitchell: Contemporary Critical Perspectives. London, United Kingdom: Bloomsbury.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781474262101-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620637-
dc.description.abstractJacob de Zoet and Aibagawa Orito, the protagonists of The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet, think and act like people of their time and place. Mitchell's novel thus falls into step with Georg Lukács's classic Marxist account of historical fiction as a genre that 'endeavours to portray the struggles and antagonisms of history by means of characters who, in their psychology and destiny, always represent social trends and historical forces'. The gestures, hints and fantasies that characterize Jacob's and Orito's unconsummated affair suggest in microcosm the state of world historical relationships in the novel, where the expansionist West and isolationist Japan imagine one another, creating spectres of race and nation. The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet alludes to its own time by advancing Mitchell's project, begun in Ghostwritten, of engagement with the contemporary globalized world where civilizations clash in a state of mutual ignorance. Caroline Edwards has shown how Ghostwritten and Cloud Atlas offer 'a non-contemporaneous narrative present' of the sort described by Jacques Derrida in Specters of Marx. Taking its cue from Edwards's point that this disjointed present exists in Mitchell's fiction to defamiliarize and critically examine 'the globalized capitalist world of his readership', this essay will study the contemporary cultural conflicts played out in the historical setting of Mitchell's Japan.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBloomsbury Academicen
dc.relation.urlhttps://bloomsbury.com/uk/david-mitchell-9781474262101/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectliterary criticismen
dc.subjectdavid mitchellen
dc.titleHistory, Globalization and The Human Subject in The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoeten
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.date.accepted2017-09-14-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2218-03-22-
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