Metacognitive beliefs as psychological predictors of social functioning: an investigation with young people at risk of psychosis

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620631
Title:
Metacognitive beliefs as psychological predictors of social functioning: an investigation with young people at risk of psychosis
Authors:
Bright, Measha; Parker, Sophie; French, Paul; Fowler, David; Gumley, Andrew; Morrison, Anthony P.; Birchwood, Max; Jones, Peter B.; Stewart, Suzanne L. K.; Wells, Adrian
Abstract:
Poor social functioning has been found to be present in those at risk for psychosis. This study aimed to examine metacognitive beliefs as potential predictors of structured activity (measure of social functioning) in those with an At Risk Mental State (ARMS). Regression and correlation analyses were conducted. The sample included 109 young people. Age was found to be positively correlated to structured activity. Metacognitive beliefs concerning uncontrollability and danger of worry were found to negatively predict structured activity. This was after controlling for age, gender, treatment allocation, cognitive schemas, positive symptom severity, social anxiety, and depression. Metacognitive danger items were most important. Age was the only control variable found to be an independent predictor of structured activity in the regression model, despite negative bi-variate relationships with structured activity found across three cognitive schema subscales and social anxiety. This is the first study to find that higher negative metacognitive beliefs about uncontrollability and danger predict lower social functioning in an ARMS sample, and that the perception of thoughts being dangerous was of particular importance. Psychological interventions should consider targeting this metacognitive dimension to increase social functioning. Future longitudinal research is required to strengthen findings in this area.
Affiliation:
University of Manchester; Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust; University of Sussex; Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust; University of Glasgow; University of Warwick; University of Cambridge; University of Chester
Citation:
Bright, M., Parker, S., French, P., Fowler, D., Gumley, A., Morrison, A. P.,..., Wells, A. (2017). Metacognitive beliefs as psychological predictors of social functioning: An investigation with young people at risk of psychosis. Psychiatry Research. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.09.037
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Psychiatry Research
Publication Date:
14-Sep-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620631
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2017.09.037
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S016517811730197X?via%3Dihub
Type:
Article
Language:
en
EISSN:
1872-7123
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBright, Meashaen
dc.contributor.authorParker, Sophieen
dc.contributor.authorFrench, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorFowler, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorGumley, Andrewen
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, Anthony P.en
dc.contributor.authorBirchwood, Maxen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Peter B.en
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Suzanne L. K.en
dc.contributor.authorWells, Adrianen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-26T09:04:52Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-26T09:04:52Z-
dc.date.issued2017-09-14-
dc.identifier.citationBright, M., Parker, S., French, P., Fowler, D., Gumley, A., Morrison, A. P.,..., Wells, A. (2017). Metacognitive beliefs as psychological predictors of social functioning: An investigation with young people at risk of psychosis. Psychiatry Research. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.09.037en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psychres.2017.09.037-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620631-
dc.description.abstractPoor social functioning has been found to be present in those at risk for psychosis. This study aimed to examine metacognitive beliefs as potential predictors of structured activity (measure of social functioning) in those with an At Risk Mental State (ARMS). Regression and correlation analyses were conducted. The sample included 109 young people. Age was found to be positively correlated to structured activity. Metacognitive beliefs concerning uncontrollability and danger of worry were found to negatively predict structured activity. This was after controlling for age, gender, treatment allocation, cognitive schemas, positive symptom severity, social anxiety, and depression. Metacognitive danger items were most important. Age was the only control variable found to be an independent predictor of structured activity in the regression model, despite negative bi-variate relationships with structured activity found across three cognitive schema subscales and social anxiety. This is the first study to find that higher negative metacognitive beliefs about uncontrollability and danger predict lower social functioning in an ARMS sample, and that the perception of thoughts being dangerous was of particular importance. Psychological interventions should consider targeting this metacognitive dimension to increase social functioning. Future longitudinal research is required to strengthen findings in this area.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S016517811730197X?via%3Dihuben
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectMetacognitionen
dc.subjectStructured activityen
dc.subjectCognitiveen
dc.subjectARMSen
dc.subjectSchemasen
dc.subjectPositive symptomsen
dc.subjectSocial anxietyen
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.titleMetacognitive beliefs as psychological predictors of social functioning: an investigation with young people at risk of psychosisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1872-7123-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Manchester; Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust; University of Sussex; Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust; University of Glasgow; University of Warwick; University of Cambridge; University of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalPsychiatry Researchen
dc.date.accepted2017-09-12-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderMedical Research Councilen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectG0500264en
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-09-14-
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