Selective Remembering: Minorities and the Remembrance of the First World War in Britain and Germany

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620563
Title:
Selective Remembering: Minorities and the Remembrance of the First World War in Britain and Germany
Authors:
Grady, Tim
Abstract:
Remembering the war dead, so historical writing suggests, was considerably easier for the victors than for the vanquished. Yet, as this essay suggests, this strict dichotomy was not quite as rigid as the historiography implies. In both Britain and Germany, ethnic, religious and national minorities did play some role in nascent memory cultures. However, while some groups were remembered, other minorities, such as Britain’s African troops or Germany’s Polish soldiers, were all too often missing from the commemorative landscape. The absence of minorities from the remembrance process, then, had less to do with the outcome of the war, but was rather contingent on place, time and the minority group in question.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Grady, T. (2017). Selective Remembering: Minorities and the Remembrance of the First World War in Britain and Germany. In H. Ewence & T. Grady (Eds.), Minorities and the First World War: From War to Peace. Basingstoke, United Kingdom: Palgrave Macmillan.
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan
Publication Date:
17-Jun-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620563
Additional Links:
http://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137539748
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9781137539755
Appears in Collections:
History and Archaeology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGrady, Timen
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-19T13:41:25Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-19T13:41:25Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-17-
dc.identifier.citationGrady, T. (2017). Selective Remembering: Minorities and the Remembrance of the First World War in Britain and Germany. In H. Ewence & T. Grady (Eds.), Minorities and the First World War: From War to Peace. Basingstoke, United Kingdom: Palgrave Macmillan.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781137539755-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620563-
dc.description.abstractRemembering the war dead, so historical writing suggests, was considerably easier for the victors than for the vanquished. Yet, as this essay suggests, this strict dichotomy was not quite as rigid as the historiography implies. In both Britain and Germany, ethnic, religious and national minorities did play some role in nascent memory cultures. However, while some groups were remembered, other minorities, such as Britain’s African troops or Germany’s Polish soldiers, were all too often missing from the commemorative landscape. The absence of minorities from the remembrance process, then, had less to do with the outcome of the war, but was rather contingent on place, time and the minority group in question.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillanen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137539748en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectFirst World Waren
dc.subjectRemembranceen
dc.subjectMemoryen
dc.titleSelective Remembering: Minorities and the Remembrance of the First World War in Britain and Germanyen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.date.accepted2017-05-09-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Chesteren
rioxxterms.identifier.projectDept. sabbatical, 2016/17en
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2217-07-19-
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