The use of projective techniques to circumvent socially desirable responses or reveal the subconscious.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620555
Title:
The use of projective techniques to circumvent socially desirable responses or reveal the subconscious.
Authors:
Hindley, Ann; Font, Xavier
Abstract:
Projective techniques have considerable potential to study consumer behaviour and are widely used in commercial market research and psychology, but not in tourism and hospitality research. This chapter demonstrates that tourism and hospitality researchers can collect richer data from smaller samples by using projective techniques, which provide more flexibility and allow the combination of multiple projective methods to triangulate findings. Projective techniques are qualitative methods that reach the subconscious of respondents by asking them to interpret information or complete tasks, which circumvent normative responses that create social desirability bias. Five techniques are outlined: collage, choice ordering, word association, photo elicitation and a scenario expressive technique. The study found that the most successful instrument for reducing social desirability bias was word association, while the least successful was photo-expression. The limitations are the highly resource intensive nature of rigorous analysis, ambiguous stimuli impacting on the complexity of data elicitation and codification, and variations in interpretation of the meaning of the results.
Affiliation:
University of Chester; University of Surrey
Citation:
HIndley, A. & Font, X. (2017). The use of projective techniques to circumvent socially desirable responses or reveal the subconscious. In Robin Nunkoo (ed.) Handbook of Research Methods for Tourism and Hospitality Management. Abingdon: Edward Elgar.
Publisher:
Edward Elgar Publishing
Publication Date:
Nov-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620555
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISSN:
9781785366277
Appears in Collections:
Chester Business School

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHindley, Annen
dc.contributor.authorFont, Xavieren
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-05T12:04:19Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-05T12:04:19Z-
dc.date.issued2017-11-
dc.identifier.citationHIndley, A. & Font, X. (2017). The use of projective techniques to circumvent socially desirable responses or reveal the subconscious. In Robin Nunkoo (ed.) Handbook of Research Methods for Tourism and Hospitality Management. Abingdon: Edward Elgar.en
dc.identifier.issn9781785366277-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620555-
dc.description.abstractProjective techniques have considerable potential to study consumer behaviour and are widely used in commercial market research and psychology, but not in tourism and hospitality research. This chapter demonstrates that tourism and hospitality researchers can collect richer data from smaller samples by using projective techniques, which provide more flexibility and allow the combination of multiple projective methods to triangulate findings. Projective techniques are qualitative methods that reach the subconscious of respondents by asking them to interpret information or complete tasks, which circumvent normative responses that create social desirability bias. Five techniques are outlined: collage, choice ordering, word association, photo elicitation and a scenario expressive technique. The study found that the most successful instrument for reducing social desirability bias was word association, while the least successful was photo-expression. The limitations are the highly resource intensive nature of rigorous analysis, ambiguous stimuli impacting on the complexity of data elicitation and codification, and variations in interpretation of the meaning of the results.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEdward Elgar Publishingen
dc.subjectprojective techniquesen
dc.subjectsocial desirabilityen
dc.subjectclimate changeen
dc.subjecttourism researchen
dc.subjectqualitative researchen
dc.subjectconsumer behaviouren
dc.titleThe use of projective techniques to circumvent socially desirable responses or reveal the subconscious.en
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; University of Surreyen
dc.date.accepted2017-04-01-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2217-11-30-
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