Speakers for the Dead: digital memory and the construction of identity

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620518
Title:
Speakers for the Dead: digital memory and the construction of identity
Authors:
Vincent, Alana M.
Abstract:
In the wake of the killing of twelve people at the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, thousands of individuals—many of whom had never before seen a copy of the paper—changed their Facebook statuses, profile pictures, or Twitter updates to “Je suis Charlie.” A month previously, a similar outpouring of digital sentiment took place in response to a New York grand jury’s decision not to indict police officers who had been filmed choking Eric Garner to death: #icantbreathe. These two events are, of course, not unique—one might also note Le Monde’s editorial headline on 12 September 2001, “Nous sommes tous Americains”, or even John F. Kennedy’s 1963 declaration “Ich bin ein Berliner”—but they are exemplary of an increasing tendency towards the appropriation of another’s identity as a ritual of public mourning. This paper considers these appropriative rituals in a wider historical context of memorialisation as constitutive of collective identity, arguing that, while the internet did not originate this ritual of remembrance via appropriation, its increasing dominance is a consequence of the immediacy and international nature of digital culture. It then presents an analysis of the politics of the “us” which results from these commemorative rituals, making some suggestions about whether, and how, the problematic notion of collective identity is transforming in the digital age.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Vincent, A. (2017-forthcoming). Speakers for the Dead: digital memory and the construction of identity. In J. Svenungsson & S. Helgesson (eds.) The Ethos of History. New York, NY: Berghahn Books.
Publisher:
Berghahn Books
Publication Date:
2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620518
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Theology and Religious Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVincent, Alana M.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-31T08:49:17Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-31T08:49:17Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationVincent, A. (2017-forthcoming). Speakers for the Dead: digital memory and the construction of identity. In J. Svenungsson & S. Helgesson (eds.) The Ethos of History. New York, NY: Berghahn Books.en
dc.identifier.othercurrently unknown-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620518-
dc.description.abstractIn the wake of the killing of twelve people at the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, thousands of individuals—many of whom had never before seen a copy of the paper—changed their Facebook statuses, profile pictures, or Twitter updates to “Je suis Charlie.” A month previously, a similar outpouring of digital sentiment took place in response to a New York grand jury’s decision not to indict police officers who had been filmed choking Eric Garner to death: #icantbreathe. These two events are, of course, not unique—one might also note Le Monde’s editorial headline on 12 September 2001, “Nous sommes tous Americains”, or even John F. Kennedy’s 1963 declaration “Ich bin ein Berliner”—but they are exemplary of an increasing tendency towards the appropriation of another’s identity as a ritual of public mourning. This paper considers these appropriative rituals in a wider historical context of memorialisation as constitutive of collective identity, arguing that, while the internet did not originate this ritual of remembrance via appropriation, its increasing dominance is a consequence of the immediacy and international nature of digital culture. It then presents an analysis of the politics of the “us” which results from these commemorative rituals, making some suggestions about whether, and how, the problematic notion of collective identity is transforming in the digital age.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBerghahn Booksen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/en
dc.subjectArendten
dc.subjectdigital cultureen
dc.subjectcollective memoryen
dc.subjectcollective identityen
dc.titleSpeakers for the Dead: digital memory and the construction of identityen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.date.accepted2017-03-17-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2217-12-31-
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