Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620491
Title:
Bicycle design history and systems
Authors:
Cox, Peter
Abstract:
This chapter focuses on the ways in which bicycle design connects with a range of factors; how external forces may shape reinterpretations of bicycle design, and how bicycle design, in turn, may be used to try to shape the external world. Two historical cases are explored to show how bicycles, as design objects, are entangled with practices and identities: Germany in the 1920s and 1930s and England in the 1960s and 1970s. In the first case, design is used to reproduce and reinforce a dominant political ideology through reinterpretation rather than innovation. Here the bicycle allows new connections to be made between state and citizen. In the second case, design innovation is employed to challenge dominant ideologies of mobility: bicycles are used to connect citizens to new mobility practices. Both cases illustrate the relations between design and politics and both have implications for inclusion and access aspects of social justice. Both studies make use of close reading of manufacturers’ literature but place it more strongly in a political/cultural context to understand the relationship between the design objects and wider society.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Cox, P. (2017). Bicycle Design History and Systems of Mobility. In J. Spinney, S. Reimer, & P. Pinch (Eds.), Mobilising Design, Designing Mobilities: Intersections, Affordances, Relations (pp. 48-61). London, United Kingdom: Routledge.
Publisher:
Routledge
Publication Date:
2-Feb-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620491
Additional Links:
https://www.routledge.com/Mobilising-Design/Spinney-Reimer-Pinch/p/book/9781138676374
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9781138676374
Appears in Collections:
Social and Political Science

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCox, Peteren
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-09T08:35:48Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-09T08:35:48Z-
dc.date.issued2017-02-02-
dc.identifier.citationCox, P. (2017). Bicycle Design History and Systems of Mobility. In J. Spinney, S. Reimer, & P. Pinch (Eds.), Mobilising Design, Designing Mobilities: Intersections, Affordances, Relations (pp. 48-61). London, United Kingdom: Routledge.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781138676374-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620491-
dc.description.abstractThis chapter focuses on the ways in which bicycle design connects with a range of factors; how external forces may shape reinterpretations of bicycle design, and how bicycle design, in turn, may be used to try to shape the external world. Two historical cases are explored to show how bicycles, as design objects, are entangled with practices and identities: Germany in the 1920s and 1930s and England in the 1960s and 1970s. In the first case, design is used to reproduce and reinforce a dominant political ideology through reinterpretation rather than innovation. Here the bicycle allows new connections to be made between state and citizen. In the second case, design innovation is employed to challenge dominant ideologies of mobility: bicycles are used to connect citizens to new mobility practices. Both cases illustrate the relations between design and politics and both have implications for inclusion and access aspects of social justice. Both studies make use of close reading of manufacturers’ literature but place it more strongly in a political/cultural context to understand the relationship between the design objects and wider society.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.routledge.com/Mobilising-Design/Spinney-Reimer-Pinch/p/book/9781138676374en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectDesignen
dc.subjectBicycleen
dc.subjectPoliticsen
dc.subjectSocietyen
dc.titleBicycle design history and systemsen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.date.accepted2016-11-02-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2217-02-02-
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