Helping school students deal with peer provocations and avoid hostile attribution bias with a co-operative cross-age teaching intervention: A pilot study

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620430
Title:
Helping school students deal with peer provocations and avoid hostile attribution bias with a co-operative cross-age teaching intervention: A pilot study
Authors:
Boulton, Michael J.; Boulton, Louise
Abstract:
Cross-age tutoring and co-operative group work have been shown to help student tutors and tutees acquire academic and non-academic skills and knowledge. A novel intervention (Cross-Age Teaching Zone, CATZ) that combined them was tested for its effects on student tutors’ thinking skills associated with (i) dealing pro-socially with peer provocations and (ii) avoiding hostile attribution bias. Small co-operative groups of 11 and 15 year old students (n= 228) designed a CATZ lesson on these themes and delivered it to younger students. The CATZ tutors, but not matched controls (n = 189), showed significant improvements on both outcome measures. Participants aged 9 to 15 years (n = 469) were also asked about: (1) their willingness to act as CATZ tutors/tutees, (2) how effective they think such CATZ activities would be, (3) how much they valued autonomy in how they might deliver CATZ, and (4) their relative preference for being taught by older students versus teachers. Overall, participants expressed positive views of CATZ. This evidence for the effectiveness and social validity of CATZ support its more widespread use in schools to help students learn patterns of thinking that can help them avoid aggressive and conflict behavior.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Boulton, M., & Boulton, L. (2017 - in press). Helping school students deal with peer provocations and avoid hostile attribution bias with a co-operative cross-age teaching intervention: A pilot study. Psychology in the Schools.
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Psychology in the Schools
Publication Date:
2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620430
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1520-6807
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Boulton, M., & Boulton, L. (2017 - in press). Helping school students deal with peer provocations and avoid hostile attribution bias with a co-operative cross-age teaching intervention: A pilot study. Psychology in the Schools, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1520-6807. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving
EISSN:
1520-6807
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBoulton, Michael J.en
dc.contributor.authorBoulton, Louiseen
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-13T13:26:13Z-
dc.date.available2017-03-13T13:26:13Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationBoulton, M., & Boulton, L. (2017 - in press). Helping school students deal with peer provocations and avoid hostile attribution bias with a co-operative cross-age teaching intervention: A pilot study. Psychology in the Schools.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620430-
dc.descriptionThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Boulton, M., & Boulton, L. (2017 - in press). Helping school students deal with peer provocations and avoid hostile attribution bias with a co-operative cross-age teaching intervention: A pilot study. Psychology in the Schools, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1520-6807. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archivingen
dc.description.abstractCross-age tutoring and co-operative group work have been shown to help student tutors and tutees acquire academic and non-academic skills and knowledge. A novel intervention (Cross-Age Teaching Zone, CATZ) that combined them was tested for its effects on student tutors’ thinking skills associated with (i) dealing pro-socially with peer provocations and (ii) avoiding hostile attribution bias. Small co-operative groups of 11 and 15 year old students (n= 228) designed a CATZ lesson on these themes and delivered it to younger students. The CATZ tutors, but not matched controls (n = 189), showed significant improvements on both outcome measures. Participants aged 9 to 15 years (n = 469) were also asked about: (1) their willingness to act as CATZ tutors/tutees, (2) how effective they think such CATZ activities would be, (3) how much they valued autonomy in how they might deliver CATZ, and (4) their relative preference for being taught by older students versus teachers. Overall, participants expressed positive views of CATZ. This evidence for the effectiveness and social validity of CATZ support its more widespread use in schools to help students learn patterns of thinking that can help them avoid aggressive and conflict behavior.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1520-6807en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectPeer provocationsen
dc.subjectHostile attribution biasen
dc.titleHelping school students deal with peer provocations and avoid hostile attribution bias with a co-operative cross-age teaching intervention: A pilot studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1520-6807-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalPsychology in the Schoolsen
dc.date.accepted2016-07-02-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2217-03-13-
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