Bystander behaviour in response to traditional/cyber bullying scenarios: a consideration of victimisation/perpetration, empathy and severity

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620408
Title:
Bystander behaviour in response to traditional/cyber bullying scenarios: a consideration of victimisation/perpetration, empathy and severity
Authors:
Macaulay, Peter
Abstract:
The current study aimed to investigate bystander behaviour across traditional and cyber bullying scenarios that changed in severity: mild, moderate and severe. Participant’s victimisation/perpetration and emotional/cognitive traits were also measured and considered in respect to bystander behaviour. A total of 868 adolescent pupils’ (males: N = 458, females: N = 410) completed a self-report questionnaire comprising of three hypothetical traditional and cyber bullying scenarios respectively that increased in severity. Victimisation/perpetration and emotional/cognitive trait items were also included within the questionnaire. The findings showed that positive bystander behaviour was higher in cyber compared to traditional bullying, with females showing higher positive bystander behaviours in both traditional and cyber bullying scenarios. No relationship of age was found. A positive relationship was found between victimisation and perpetration experience in both types of bullying, although victimisation experience was not associated with positive bystander behaviour. With the exception of traditional perpetration, cyber perpetration was associated with negative bystander behaviour where males had higher perpetration scores compared to females in both types of bullying. No gender differences on victimisation were found. Findings to support previous literature on empathy were found. It was found that severity did have an effect on bystander behaviour with more severe scenarios leading to positive bystander behaviour in both types of bullying, although no difference between severe traditional or cyber were found. The practical application of these findings encourages educators and intervention developers to utilise adolescent’s bystander knowledge to reduce bullying acts in the school environment. Future research should examine the effect of bystander awareness training on adolescent’s positive bystander behaviour across two time periods.
Advisors:
Boulton, Michael J.
Citation:
Macauley, P. (2016). Bystander behaviour in response to traditional/cyber bullying scenarios: a consideration of victimisation/perpetration, empathy and severity (Master's thesis). University of Chester, United Kingdom.
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620408
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorBoulton, Michael J.en
dc.contributor.authorMacaulay, Peteren
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-28T09:43:56Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-28T09:43:56Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationMacauley, P. (2016). Bystander behaviour in response to traditional/cyber bullying scenarios: a consideration of victimisation/perpetration, empathy and severity (Master's thesis). University of Chester, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620408-
dc.description.abstractThe current study aimed to investigate bystander behaviour across traditional and cyber bullying scenarios that changed in severity: mild, moderate and severe. Participant’s victimisation/perpetration and emotional/cognitive traits were also measured and considered in respect to bystander behaviour. A total of 868 adolescent pupils’ (males: N = 458, females: N = 410) completed a self-report questionnaire comprising of three hypothetical traditional and cyber bullying scenarios respectively that increased in severity. Victimisation/perpetration and emotional/cognitive trait items were also included within the questionnaire. The findings showed that positive bystander behaviour was higher in cyber compared to traditional bullying, with females showing higher positive bystander behaviours in both traditional and cyber bullying scenarios. No relationship of age was found. A positive relationship was found between victimisation and perpetration experience in both types of bullying, although victimisation experience was not associated with positive bystander behaviour. With the exception of traditional perpetration, cyber perpetration was associated with negative bystander behaviour where males had higher perpetration scores compared to females in both types of bullying. No gender differences on victimisation were found. Findings to support previous literature on empathy were found. It was found that severity did have an effect on bystander behaviour with more severe scenarios leading to positive bystander behaviour in both types of bullying, although no difference between severe traditional or cyber were found. The practical application of these findings encourages educators and intervention developers to utilise adolescent’s bystander knowledge to reduce bullying acts in the school environment. Future research should examine the effect of bystander awareness training on adolescent’s positive bystander behaviour across two time periods.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectbullyingen
dc.subjectbystander behaviouren
dc.titleBystander behaviour in response to traditional/cyber bullying scenarios: a consideration of victimisation/perpetration, empathy and severityen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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