The Effects of Superstition on Stress Levels and the Relationship between Superstition and Religion

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620403
Title:
The Effects of Superstition on Stress Levels and the Relationship between Superstition and Religion
Authors:
Roddy, Siobhan
Abstract:
Beliefs in paranormal phenomena have often been divided into various subcategories, with superstition and religion being the two subcategories to be scientifically studied. Current research on superstition has shown that there is an important relationship between stress and superstition. Research has led to conclusions that superstitious beliefs increase in times of stress, enhance performance and even help reduce feelings of stress (Keinan, 1994; Keinan, 2002, Langer, 197; Teo & Lasikiewicz, 2015). Additionally, many studies have suggested there is an important relationship between religion and superstition, indicating both positive and negative relationships. To gain more insight into these relationships, 28 participants between the ages of 18 and 71 with an average age of 35 took part in a cognitive experiment. They were placed into four conditions with 7 participants in each. The experiment utilised a Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) and five self-report questionnaires. The results investigating superstition and stress found two significant results. One showed that there was an increase in state anxiety (STAI) over time during the experiment, and the second revealed that participants in the no-stress condition with a lucky pen had significantly higher heart rates (HR) than those in the no-stress condition without the lucky pen. Additionally the results revealed no significant correlations between religion and superstition. Although the results found no conclusive evidence to support the hypotheses, the significant results suggest there may be a relationship between stress and superstition, and the results of religion and superstition highlight how experimental improvements may be required in further research.
Advisors:
Lasikiewicz, Nicola
Citation:
Roddy, S. (2016). The effects of superstition on stress levels and the relationship between superstition and religion (Master's thesis). University of Chester, United Kingdom.
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620403
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorLasikiewicz, Nicolaen
dc.contributor.authorRoddy, Siobhanen
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-27T14:58:23Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-27T14:58:23Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationRoddy, S. (2016). The effects of superstition on stress levels and the relationship between superstition and religion (Master's thesis). University of Chester, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620403-
dc.description.abstractBeliefs in paranormal phenomena have often been divided into various subcategories, with superstition and religion being the two subcategories to be scientifically studied. Current research on superstition has shown that there is an important relationship between stress and superstition. Research has led to conclusions that superstitious beliefs increase in times of stress, enhance performance and even help reduce feelings of stress (Keinan, 1994; Keinan, 2002, Langer, 197; Teo & Lasikiewicz, 2015). Additionally, many studies have suggested there is an important relationship between religion and superstition, indicating both positive and negative relationships. To gain more insight into these relationships, 28 participants between the ages of 18 and 71 with an average age of 35 took part in a cognitive experiment. They were placed into four conditions with 7 participants in each. The experiment utilised a Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) and five self-report questionnaires. The results investigating superstition and stress found two significant results. One showed that there was an increase in state anxiety (STAI) over time during the experiment, and the second revealed that participants in the no-stress condition with a lucky pen had significantly higher heart rates (HR) than those in the no-stress condition without the lucky pen. Additionally the results revealed no significant correlations between religion and superstition. Although the results found no conclusive evidence to support the hypotheses, the significant results suggest there may be a relationship between stress and superstition, and the results of religion and superstition highlight how experimental improvements may be required in further research.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectsuperstitionen
dc.subjectreligionen
dc.subjectstressen
dc.titleThe Effects of Superstition on Stress Levels and the Relationship between Superstition and Religionen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
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