Work-based learning as a catalyst for sustainability: a review and prospects

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620395
Title:
Work-based learning as a catalyst for sustainability: a review and prospects
Authors:
Wall, Tony; Hindley, Ann; Hunt, Tamara; Peach, Jeremy; Preston, Martin; Hartley, Courtney; Fairbank, Amy
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the continuing dearth of scholarship about the role of work based learning in education for sustainable development, and particularly the urgent demands of climate literacy. It is proposed that forms of work based learning can act as catalysts for wider cultural change, towards embedding climate literacy in higher education institutions. Design/methodology/approach: This paper draws data from action research to present a case study of a Climate Change Project conducted through a work based learning module at a mid-sized university in the United Kingdom. Findings: Contrary to the predominantly fragmented and disciplinary bounded approaches to sustainability and climate literacy, the case study demonstrates how a form of work based learning can create a unifying vision for action, and do so across multiple disciplinary, professional service, and identity boundaries. In addition, the project generated indicators of cultural change including extensive faculty level climate change resources, creative ideas for an innovative mobile application, and new infrastructural arrangements to further develop practice and research in climate change. Research limitations/implications: Practical implications: This paper provides an illustrative example of how a pan-faculty work based learning module can act as a catalyst for change at a higher education institution. Originality/value: This paper is a contemporary call for action to stimulate and expedite climate literacy in higher education, and is the first to propose that certain forms of work based learning curricula can be a route to combating highly bounded and fragmented approaches, towards a unified and boundary-crossing approach.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Wall, T., Hindley, A., Hunt, T., Peach, J., Preston, M., Hartley, C., & Fairbank, A. (2017). Work-based learning as a catalyst for sustainability: a review and prospects. Higher Education Skills and Work Based Learning, 7(2), 211-224. DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-02-2017-0014
Publisher:
Emerald
Journal:
Higher Education, Skills and Work Based Learning
Publication Date:
20-Feb-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620395
DOI:
10.1108/HESWBL-02-2017-0014
Additional Links:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/HESWBL-02-2017-0014
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2042-3896
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Work Related Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWall, Tonyen
dc.contributor.authorHindley, Annen
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Tamaraen
dc.contributor.authorPeach, Jeremyen
dc.contributor.authorPreston, Martinen
dc.contributor.authorHartley, Courtneyen
dc.contributor.authorFairbank, Amyen
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-21T14:31:21Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-21T14:31:21Z-
dc.date.issued2017-02-20-
dc.identifier.citationWall, T., Hindley, A., Hunt, T., Peach, J., Preston, M., Hartley, C., & Fairbank, A. (2017). Work-based learning as a catalyst for sustainability: a review and prospects. Higher Education Skills and Work Based Learning, 7(2), 211-224. DOI: 10.1108/HESWBL-02-2017-0014en
dc.identifier.issn2042-3896-
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/HESWBL-02-2017-0014-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620395-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the continuing dearth of scholarship about the role of work based learning in education for sustainable development, and particularly the urgent demands of climate literacy. It is proposed that forms of work based learning can act as catalysts for wider cultural change, towards embedding climate literacy in higher education institutions. Design/methodology/approach: This paper draws data from action research to present a case study of a Climate Change Project conducted through a work based learning module at a mid-sized university in the United Kingdom. Findings: Contrary to the predominantly fragmented and disciplinary bounded approaches to sustainability and climate literacy, the case study demonstrates how a form of work based learning can create a unifying vision for action, and do so across multiple disciplinary, professional service, and identity boundaries. In addition, the project generated indicators of cultural change including extensive faculty level climate change resources, creative ideas for an innovative mobile application, and new infrastructural arrangements to further develop practice and research in climate change. Research limitations/implications: Practical implications: This paper provides an illustrative example of how a pan-faculty work based learning module can act as a catalyst for change at a higher education institution. Originality/value: This paper is a contemporary call for action to stimulate and expedite climate literacy in higher education, and is the first to propose that certain forms of work based learning curricula can be a route to combating highly bounded and fragmented approaches, towards a unified and boundary-crossing approach.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmeralden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/HESWBL-02-2017-0014en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectwork based learningen
dc.subjectsustainabilityen
dc.subjectclimate changeen
dc.subjectclimate literacyen
dc.titleWork-based learning as a catalyst for sustainability: a review and prospectsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalHigher Education, Skills and Work Based Learningen
dc.date.accepted2017-02-18-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfunded researchen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-02-20-
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