Understanding university students’ time use: a mixed-methods study of their leisure lives

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620386
Title:
Understanding university students’ time use: a mixed-methods study of their leisure lives
Authors:
Wilson, Lee S.
Abstract:
This thesis explores patterns of time use among university students to further understand their leisure time as an aspect of their day-to day lives, especially with regard to their time spent drinking alcohol. Attending university can be viewed as a key aspect in the prolongation of the youth life-stage for some young people, and a key influence on how they develop their own identities and spend their leisure time. In this regard, research suggests that far from being a homogeneous group, there can be a marked difference between sub-groups of students. Residence, for example, has been shown to be a particularly significant factor influencing how students report their university experience. Furthermore, a number of studies report that rather than being fixed, young people’s leisure lives, including their time spent drinking, tend to be dynamic, context-dependent and develop in some significant ways during their university careers. However, studies that have focused on university students have tended to study aspects of their leisure in isolation. This study aimed to address this limitation by studying students’ lives ‘in the round’ in order to more adequately understand the contextual complexity of their lives and how this might shape patterns of time use on leisure in general and drinking alcohol in particular.
Advisors:
Green, Ken
Citation:
Wilson, L. S. (2015). Understanding university students’ time use: a mixed-methods study of their leisure lives. (Doctoral dissertation). University of Chester, United Kingdom.
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
Jun-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620386
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorGreen, Kenen
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Lee S.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-16T17:43:03Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-16T17:43:03Z-
dc.date.issued2015-06-
dc.identifier.citationWilson, L. S. (2015). Understanding university students’ time use: a mixed-methods study of their leisure lives. (Doctoral dissertation). University of Chester, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620386-
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores patterns of time use among university students to further understand their leisure time as an aspect of their day-to day lives, especially with regard to their time spent drinking alcohol. Attending university can be viewed as a key aspect in the prolongation of the youth life-stage for some young people, and a key influence on how they develop their own identities and spend their leisure time. In this regard, research suggests that far from being a homogeneous group, there can be a marked difference between sub-groups of students. Residence, for example, has been shown to be a particularly significant factor influencing how students report their university experience. Furthermore, a number of studies report that rather than being fixed, young people’s leisure lives, including their time spent drinking, tend to be dynamic, context-dependent and develop in some significant ways during their university careers. However, studies that have focused on university students have tended to study aspects of their leisure in isolation. This study aimed to address this limitation by studying students’ lives ‘in the round’ in order to more adequately understand the contextual complexity of their lives and how this might shape patterns of time use on leisure in general and drinking alcohol in particular.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectLeisureen
dc.subjectStudentsen
dc.titleUnderstanding university students’ time use: a mixed-methods study of their leisure livesen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.rights.embargodate2018-06-07-
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen
dc.rights.embargoreasonThe thesis includes material intended for future publicationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
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