Androgens in a female primate: relationships with reproductive status, age, dominance rank, fetal sex and secondary sexual color

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620378
Title:
Androgens in a female primate: relationships with reproductive status, age, dominance rank, fetal sex and secondary sexual color
Authors:
Setchell, Joanna M.; Smith, Tessa E.; Knapp, Leslie A.
Abstract:
A comprehensive understanding of the role of androgens in reproduction, behavior andmorphology requires the examination of female, aswell as male, hormone profiles. However, we know far less about the biological significance of androgens in females than in males. We investigated the relationships between fecal androgen (immunoreactive testosterone) levels and reproductive status, age, dominance rank, fetal sex and a secondary sexual trait (facial color) in semi-free-ranging femalemandrills (Mandrillus sphinx), using samples collected from19 reproductively mature females over 13 months. Fecal androgens varied with reproductive status, being highest during gestation. Fecal androgens began to increase at 3 months of gestation, and peaked at 5 months. This pattern is more similar to that found in a platyrrhine than in other cercopithecine species, suggesting that such patterns are not necessarily phylogenetically constrained. Fecal androgens did not vary systematically with rank, in contrast to the relationship we have reported for male mandrills, and in line with sex differences in how rank is acquired and maintained. Offspring sex was unrelated to fecal androgens, either prior to conception or during gestation, contrasting with studies of other primate species. Mean facial color was positively related to mean fecal androgens across females, reflecting the same relationship inmalemandrills. However, the relationship between color and androgens was negative within females. Future studies of the relationship between female androgens and social behavior, reproduction and secondary sexual traits will help to elucidate the factors underlying the similarities and differences found between the sexes and among studies.
Affiliation:
Durham University; University of Chester; University of Cambridge
Citation:
Setchell, J. M., Smith, T., & Knapp, L. A. (2015). Androgens in a female primate: relationships with reproductive status, age, dominance rank, fetal sex and secondary sexual color. Physiology and Behavior, 147, 245-254. DOI: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.04.051
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Physiology and Behavior
Publication Date:
1-May-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620378
DOI:
10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.04.051
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031938415002589
Type:
Article
Language:
en
EISSN:
1873-507X
Appears in Collections:
Biological Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSetchell, Joanna M.en
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Tessa E.en
dc.contributor.authorKnapp, Leslie A.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-15T12:05:33Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-15T12:05:33Z-
dc.date.issued2015-05-01-
dc.identifier.citationSetchell, J. M., Smith, T., & Knapp, L. A. (2015). Androgens in a female primate: relationships with reproductive status, age, dominance rank, fetal sex and secondary sexual color. Physiology and Behavior, 147, 245-254. DOI: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.04.051en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.04.051-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620378-
dc.description.abstractA comprehensive understanding of the role of androgens in reproduction, behavior andmorphology requires the examination of female, aswell as male, hormone profiles. However, we know far less about the biological significance of androgens in females than in males. We investigated the relationships between fecal androgen (immunoreactive testosterone) levels and reproductive status, age, dominance rank, fetal sex and a secondary sexual trait (facial color) in semi-free-ranging femalemandrills (Mandrillus sphinx), using samples collected from19 reproductively mature females over 13 months. Fecal androgens varied with reproductive status, being highest during gestation. Fecal androgens began to increase at 3 months of gestation, and peaked at 5 months. This pattern is more similar to that found in a platyrrhine than in other cercopithecine species, suggesting that such patterns are not necessarily phylogenetically constrained. Fecal androgens did not vary systematically with rank, in contrast to the relationship we have reported for male mandrills, and in line with sex differences in how rank is acquired and maintained. Offspring sex was unrelated to fecal androgens, either prior to conception or during gestation, contrasting with studies of other primate species. Mean facial color was positively related to mean fecal androgens across females, reflecting the same relationship inmalemandrills. However, the relationship between color and androgens was negative within females. Future studies of the relationship between female androgens and social behavior, reproduction and secondary sexual traits will help to elucidate the factors underlying the similarities and differences found between the sexes and among studies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031938415002589en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectMandrillus sphinxen
dc.subjectFacial coloren
dc.subjectSexual ornamentsen
dc.subjectDominance ranken
dc.subjectAndrogenen
dc.titleAndrogens in a female primate: relationships with reproductive status, age, dominance rank, fetal sex and secondary sexual coloren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1873-507X-
dc.contributor.departmentDurham University; University of Chester; University of Cambridgeen
dc.identifier.journalPhysiology and Behavioren
dc.date.accepted2015-04-28-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderLeverhulme Trusten
rioxxterms.identifier.projectLeverhulme Trust F/01576/Ben
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-05-01-
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