Ultra-brief non-expert-delivered defusion and acceptance exercises for food cravings: A partial replication study

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620348
Title:
Ultra-brief non-expert-delivered defusion and acceptance exercises for food cravings: A partial replication study
Authors:
Hulbert-Williams, Lee; Hulbert-Williams, Nicholas J.; Nicholls, Wendy; Williamson, Sian; Poonia, Jivone; Hochard, Kevin D.
Abstract:
Food cravings are a common barrier to losing weight. This paper presents a randomised comparison of non-expert group-delivered ultra-brief defusion and acceptance interventions against a distraction control. Sixty-three participants were asked to carry a bag of chocolates for a week whilst trying to resist the temptation to eat them. A behavioural rebound measure was administered. Each intervention out-performed control in respect of consumption, but not cravings. These techniques may have a place in the clinical management of food cravings. We provide tentative evidence that the mechanism of action is through decreased reactivity to cravings, not through reduced frequency of cravings.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Hulbert-Williams L., Hulbert-Williams N. J., Nicholls W., Williamson S., Poonia J., & Hochard K. D. (2017). Ultra-brief non-expert-delivered defusion and acceptance exercises for food cravings: A partial replication study. Journal of Health Psychology. DOI: 10.1177/1359105317695424
Publisher:
SAGE
Journal:
Journal of Health Psychology
Publication Date:
10-Mar-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620348
DOI:
10.1177/1359105317695424
Additional Links:
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1359105317695424
Type:
Article
Language:
en
EISSN:
1461-7277
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHulbert-Williams, Leeen
dc.contributor.authorHulbert-Williams, Nicholas J.en
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, Wendyen
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, Sianen
dc.contributor.authorPoonia, Jivoneen
dc.contributor.authorHochard, Kevin D.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-03T09:45:00Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-03T09:45:00Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-10-
dc.identifier.citationHulbert-Williams L., Hulbert-Williams N. J., Nicholls W., Williamson S., Poonia J., & Hochard K. D. (2017). Ultra-brief non-expert-delivered defusion and acceptance exercises for food cravings: A partial replication study. Journal of Health Psychology. DOI: 10.1177/1359105317695424en
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1359105317695424-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620348-
dc.description.abstractFood cravings are a common barrier to losing weight. This paper presents a randomised comparison of non-expert group-delivered ultra-brief defusion and acceptance interventions against a distraction control. Sixty-three participants were asked to carry a bag of chocolates for a week whilst trying to resist the temptation to eat them. A behavioural rebound measure was administered. Each intervention out-performed control in respect of consumption, but not cravings. These techniques may have a place in the clinical management of food cravings. We provide tentative evidence that the mechanism of action is through decreased reactivity to cravings, not through reduced frequency of cravings.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGEen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1359105317695424en
dc.subjectAcceptanceen
dc.subjectMindfulnessen
dc.subjectCravingsen
dc.subjectCoachingen
dc.titleUltra-brief non-expert-delivered defusion and acceptance exercises for food cravings: A partial replication studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1461-7277-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Health Psychologyen
dc.date.accepted2017-02-02-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2217-02-03-
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