Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620332
Title:
Student Nurses’ Perceptions of Compassion
Authors:
Barton, Janet
Abstract:
Compassion has been associated with the nursing profession since the days of Florence Nightingale. It is a general expectation that nurses should be compassionate when they are caring for people. In the United Kingdom (UK) concerns have been raised recently that nurses are failing to be compassionate as they carry out their nursing duties. There is little evidence within the literature of how student nurses perceive compassion as they engage in the pre-registration-nursing programme. In this study, I use narrative to produce case studies as a vehicle for the students to voice their perceptions of compassion. My ethnographic analysis of their stories is framed by my own experience as a professional registered nurse and nurse educator situated within their learning environment, and applies theories of compassion and learning. In my study, themes emerge that demonstrate commonalities, differences and tensions relating to the students’ individual beliefs and behaviours, and to the impact of their professional development as they transcend from university learning spaces into clinical practice.
Advisors:
Adams, Jeff; Atherton, Frances
Citation:
Barton, J. (2016). Student nurses’ perceptions of compassion. (Doctoral dissertation). University of Chester, United Kingdom
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
30-Apr-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620332
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorAdams, Jeffen
dc.contributor.advisorAtherton, Francesen
dc.contributor.authorBarton, Janeten
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-26T14:50:33Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-26T14:50:33Z-
dc.date.issued2016-04-30-
dc.identifier.citationBarton, J. (2016). Student nurses’ perceptions of compassion. (Doctoral dissertation). University of Chester, United Kingdomen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620332-
dc.description.abstractCompassion has been associated with the nursing profession since the days of Florence Nightingale. It is a general expectation that nurses should be compassionate when they are caring for people. In the United Kingdom (UK) concerns have been raised recently that nurses are failing to be compassionate as they carry out their nursing duties. There is little evidence within the literature of how student nurses perceive compassion as they engage in the pre-registration-nursing programme. In this study, I use narrative to produce case studies as a vehicle for the students to voice their perceptions of compassion. My ethnographic analysis of their stories is framed by my own experience as a professional registered nurse and nurse educator situated within their learning environment, and applies theories of compassion and learning. In my study, themes emerge that demonstrate commonalities, differences and tensions relating to the students’ individual beliefs and behaviours, and to the impact of their professional development as they transcend from university learning spaces into clinical practice.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectcompassionen
dc.subjectnursingen
dc.subjectStudent nursesen
dc.titleStudent Nurses’ Perceptions of Compassionen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.rights.embargodate2016-11-01-
dc.type.qualificationnameEdDen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
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