What happened to the legacy from London 2012? A sociological analysis of the processes involved in preparing for a grassroots sporting legacy from London 2012 outside of the host city

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620331
Title:
What happened to the legacy from London 2012? A sociological analysis of the processes involved in preparing for a grassroots sporting legacy from London 2012 outside of the host city
Authors:
Lovett, Emily L.; Bloyce, Daniel ( 0000-0003-4114-3588 )
Abstract:
Preparations for London 2012 included promises for a sporting legacy across Britain. APS data suggest that, despite a slight spike in 2012, we have not experienced the rise in participation promised. The importance of preparations for legacy were well documented but little research has examined these processes. We examine planning for sporting legacy within a non-Olympic city in England, Birmingham. 37 semi-structured interviews were conducted with people delivering sport in Birmingham to provide a figurational analysis of relationships involved. The change in government during the economic recession saw budget cuts and a reduction in sport development personnel. Whilst various organisations struggled financially, others wanted to link to legacy. This increase in groups involved led to confusion and the unintended outcome of ‘initiativitis’. In trying to leverage legacy, a strategic approach to managing potential opportunities with clear communication of opportunities is vital. A belief in inherent inspiration cannot be relied upon. Key words: London 2012, sport legacy, figurational sociology, Birmingham, initiativitis, school sports partnerships, policy, inherent inspiration, demonstration effect
Affiliation:
Edge Hill University; University of Chester
Citation:
Lovett, E., & Bloyce, D. (2017). What happened to the legacy from London 2012? A sociological analysis of the processes involved in preparing for a grassroots sporting legacy from London 2012 outside of the host city. Sport in Society. DOI: 10.1080/17430437.2017.1284813
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
Sport in Society
Publication Date:
1-Feb-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620331
DOI:
10.1080/17430437.2017.1284813
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17430437.2017.1284813
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Sport in Society on 01/02/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17430437.2017.1284813
EISSN:
1743-0445
Appears in Collections:
Sport and Exercise Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLovett, Emily L.en
dc.contributor.authorBloyce, Danielen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-26T14:34:39Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-26T14:34:39Z-
dc.date.issued2017-02-01-
dc.identifier.citationLovett, E., & Bloyce, D. (2017). What happened to the legacy from London 2012? A sociological analysis of the processes involved in preparing for a grassroots sporting legacy from London 2012 outside of the host city. Sport in Society. DOI: 10.1080/17430437.2017.1284813en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17430437.2017.1284813-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620331-
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Sport in Society on 01/02/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17430437.2017.1284813-
dc.description.abstractPreparations for London 2012 included promises for a sporting legacy across Britain. APS data suggest that, despite a slight spike in 2012, we have not experienced the rise in participation promised. The importance of preparations for legacy were well documented but little research has examined these processes. We examine planning for sporting legacy within a non-Olympic city in England, Birmingham. 37 semi-structured interviews were conducted with people delivering sport in Birmingham to provide a figurational analysis of relationships involved. The change in government during the economic recession saw budget cuts and a reduction in sport development personnel. Whilst various organisations struggled financially, others wanted to link to legacy. This increase in groups involved led to confusion and the unintended outcome of ‘initiativitis’. In trying to leverage legacy, a strategic approach to managing potential opportunities with clear communication of opportunities is vital. A belief in inherent inspiration cannot be relied upon. Key words: London 2012, sport legacy, figurational sociology, Birmingham, initiativitis, school sports partnerships, policy, inherent inspiration, demonstration effecten
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17430437.2017.1284813-
dc.subjectLondon 2012en
dc.subjectSport legacyen
dc.subjectFigurational sociologyen
dc.subjectInitiativitisen
dc.subjectSchool sports partnershipsen
dc.subjectPolicyen
dc.subjectInherent inspirationen
dc.subjectDemonstration effecten
dc.titleWhat happened to the legacy from London 2012? A sociological analysis of the processes involved in preparing for a grassroots sporting legacy from London 2012 outside of the host cityen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1743-0445-
dc.contributor.departmentEdge Hill University; University of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalSport in Societyen
dc.date.accepted2017-01-21-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2217-01-26-
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