"Suffer Little Children": Child Sacrifice, Martyrdom, and Identity Formation in Judaism and Christianity

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620310
Title:
"Suffer Little Children": Child Sacrifice, Martyrdom, and Identity Formation in Judaism and Christianity
Authors:
Middleton, Paul
Abstract:
This essay examines the contrasting ways in which the sacrifice of children is portrayed in Jewish and Christian martyrologies. In these narratives of extreme persecution and suffering, death was often seen to be the way in which religious integrity and identity was preserved. It is argued that Jewish martyr narratives—for example, the First Crusade, Masada, and the Maccabees—reflect a developed notion of collective martyrdom, such that the deaths of children, even at the hands of their parents, are a necessary component in Jewish identity formation. By contrast, early Christianity martyr texts reflect an ambivalence towards children, to the extent that they are viewed as a potential hindrance to the successful martyrdom of their Christian mothers. Children have to be abandoned for women to retain their Christian identity.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Middleton, P. (2016). "Suffer Little Children": Child sacrifice, martyrdom, and identity formation in Judaism and Christianity. Journal of Religion and Violence, 4(3), 337-356.
Journal:
Journal of Religion and Violence
Publication Date:
Dec-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620310
DOI:
10.5840/jrv201612531
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a published work that appeared in final form in Journal of Religion and Violence. To access the final edited and published work see http://dx.doi.org/10.5840/jrv201612531
ISSN:
0738-098X
Appears in Collections:
Theology and Religious Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMiddleton, Paulen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-06T10:31:32Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-06T10:31:32Z-
dc.date.issued2016-12-
dc.identifier.citationMiddleton, P. (2016). "Suffer Little Children": Child sacrifice, martyrdom, and identity formation in Judaism and Christianity. Journal of Religion and Violence, 4(3), 337-356.en
dc.identifier.issn0738-098X-
dc.identifier.doi10.5840/jrv201612531-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620310-
dc.descriptionThis document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a published work that appeared in final form in Journal of Religion and Violence. To access the final edited and published work see http://dx.doi.org/10.5840/jrv201612531-
dc.description.abstractThis essay examines the contrasting ways in which the sacrifice of children is portrayed in Jewish and Christian martyrologies. In these narratives of extreme persecution and suffering, death was often seen to be the way in which religious integrity and identity was preserved. It is argued that Jewish martyr narratives—for example, the First Crusade, Masada, and the Maccabees—reflect a developed notion of collective martyrdom, such that the deaths of children, even at the hands of their parents, are a necessary component in Jewish identity formation. By contrast, early Christianity martyr texts reflect an ambivalence towards children, to the extent that they are viewed as a potential hindrance to the successful martyrdom of their Christian mothers. Children have to be abandoned for women to retain their Christian identity.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectMartyrdomen
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.subjectCrusadesen
dc.subjectMasadaen
dc.subjectMaccabeesen
dc.subjectIdentity Formationen
dc.title"Suffer Little Children": Child Sacrifice, Martyrdom, and Identity Formation in Judaism and Christianityen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Religion and Violenceen
dc.date.accepted2016-07-11-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2216-12-
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