Enjoyment Levels of Irish Women Performing Continuous Moderate Intensity Exercise Versus High Intensity Interval Exercise

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620296
Title:
Enjoyment Levels of Irish Women Performing Continuous Moderate Intensity Exercise Versus High Intensity Interval Exercise
Authors:
Torris, Lawrence
Abstract:
PA and exercise are widely recognised as being important for enhancing positive health and reducing risk of chronic illness. PA has been observed to be linked with chronic illnesses specific to women including breast and ovarian cancers. In Ireland, the incidence of both these types of cancers are increasing with 31% of women achieving only a low level of daily PA. Guidelines have been developed outlining the amount and types of exercise individuals should engage in to in order to attain health benefits, which can be carried out in the form of either HIIT or MCT. The Irish guidelines stand as a public health message which is more easily understood by the general public. Despite this, a number of barriers are often reported such as lack of time as preventing individuals from meeting the recommended guidelines. Type and intensity of exercise has been seen to impact upon exercise adoption and adherence, along with psychological parameters including enjoyment. HIIT has been observed to be perceived as being more enjoyable than MCT by males. Determining whether HIIT or MCT is found to be more enjoyable for females could help improve health promotion strategies which are PA based.
Citation:
Torris, L. (2015). Enjoyment levels of Irish women performing continuous moderate intensity exercise versus high intensity interval exercise. (Master's dissertation). University of Chester, United Kingdom.
Publisher:
University of Chester
Publication Date:
Sep-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620296
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Masters Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTorris, Lawrenceen
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-20T09:41:40Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-20T09:41:40Z-
dc.date.issued2015-09-
dc.identifier.citationTorris, L. (2015). Enjoyment levels of Irish women performing continuous moderate intensity exercise versus high intensity interval exercise. (Master's dissertation). University of Chester, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620296-
dc.description.abstractPA and exercise are widely recognised as being important for enhancing positive health and reducing risk of chronic illness. PA has been observed to be linked with chronic illnesses specific to women including breast and ovarian cancers. In Ireland, the incidence of both these types of cancers are increasing with 31% of women achieving only a low level of daily PA. Guidelines have been developed outlining the amount and types of exercise individuals should engage in to in order to attain health benefits, which can be carried out in the form of either HIIT or MCT. The Irish guidelines stand as a public health message which is more easily understood by the general public. Despite this, a number of barriers are often reported such as lack of time as preventing individuals from meeting the recommended guidelines. Type and intensity of exercise has been seen to impact upon exercise adoption and adherence, along with psychological parameters including enjoyment. HIIT has been observed to be perceived as being more enjoyable than MCT by males. Determining whether HIIT or MCT is found to be more enjoyable for females could help improve health promotion strategies which are PA based.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chesteren
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectContinuous moderate intensity exerciseen
dc.subjectHigh intensity interval exerciseen
dc.titleEnjoyment Levels of Irish Women Performing Continuous Moderate Intensity Exercise Versus High Intensity Interval Exerciseen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
dc.description.advisorMorris, Mikeen
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in ChesterRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.