Not a Not-Animal: The Vocation to Be a Human Animal Creature

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620277
Title:
Not a Not-Animal: The Vocation to Be a Human Animal Creature
Authors:
Clough, David
Abstract:
This article diagnoses and critiques two ‘not-animal’ modes of theological anthropology: first, the construction of human identity on the basis of supposed evidence of human/non-human difference; second, accounts of the human that take no account of God’s other creatures. It suggests that not-animal anthropologies exhibit poor theological methodology, are based on inaccurate depictions of both humans and other animals, and result in problematic construals of what it means to be human. Instead, the article concludes, we require theological anthropologies that take as a starting point the relationship between humanity and God and recognise the animal and creaturely context of human existence.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Clough, D. (2013). Not a not-animal: The vocation to be a human animal creature. Studies in Christian Ethics, 26(1), 4-17.
Publisher:
Sage
Journal:
Studies in Christian Ethics
Publication Date:
30-Jan-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620277
DOI:
10.1177/0953946812466482
Additional Links:
http://sce.sagepub.com/content/26/1/4.abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0953-9468
EISSN:
1745-5235
Appears in Collections:
Theology and Religious Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorClough, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-13T11:12:09Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-13T11:12:09Z-
dc.date.issued2013-01-30-
dc.identifier.citationClough, D. (2013). Not a not-animal: The vocation to be a human animal creature. Studies in Christian Ethics, 26(1), 4-17.en
dc.identifier.issn0953-9468-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0953946812466482-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620277-
dc.description.abstractThis article diagnoses and critiques two ‘not-animal’ modes of theological anthropology: first, the construction of human identity on the basis of supposed evidence of human/non-human difference; second, accounts of the human that take no account of God’s other creatures. It suggests that not-animal anthropologies exhibit poor theological methodology, are based on inaccurate depictions of both humans and other animals, and result in problematic construals of what it means to be human. Instead, the article concludes, we require theological anthropologies that take as a starting point the relationship between humanity and God and recognise the animal and creaturely context of human existence.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.relation.urlhttp://sce.sagepub.com/content/26/1/4.abstracten
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjecttheologyen
dc.subjectanthropologyen
dc.subjectanimalsen
dc.subjectdifferenceen
dc.subjectnot-animalen
dc.subjectethicsen
dc.titleNot a Not-Animal: The Vocation to Be a Human Animal Creatureen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1745-5235-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalStudies in Christian Ethicsen
dc.date.accepted2013-09-30-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2013-01-30-
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in ChesterRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.