The effect of a short course in cognitive and behavioural therapy (CBT) on knowledge acquisition in non-specialist CBT practitioners

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620276
Title:
The effect of a short course in cognitive and behavioural therapy (CBT) on knowledge acquisition in non-specialist CBT practitioners
Authors:
Mitchell, Andrew E. P.
Abstract:
In this study, we investigate the effects of training on knowledge acquisition in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). Knowledge acquisition is assessed through the Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Knowledge Questionnaire (CBT-KQ; Myles, Latham, Ricketts, 2002). The CBT-KQ contains 26 multiple-choice questions from five conceptual topics: general CBT issues, theoretical underpinnings of behavioural approaches, theoretical underpinnings of cognitive approaches, practice of behavioural therapy, and practice of cognitive therapy. Thirty eight students attended weekly 3 hour sessions and were tested at weeks 1 and 15 in a before and after study. Improvements in the CBT-KQ were modest but showed significant changes in three conceptual topics; general CBT issues, theoretical underpinnings of cognitive approaches and practice of cognitive therapy. These findings may have important implications for structuring CBT training, so that both the cognitive and behavioural components are shown in the knowledge acquisition and practice applications. Recent evidence suggests that the behavioural components of treatment for some conditions, such as depression, may be more important than the cognitive components. In addition, recent evidence indicates that the behavioural components might be more suitable for delivery by non-specialist CBT practitioners.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Mitchell. A. E. P. (2017). The effect of a short course in cognitive and behavioural therapy (CBT) on knowledge acquisition in non-specialist CBT practitioners. Advances in Psychology Research, 120(1), 103-118.
Publisher:
Nova Science Publishers
Journal:
Advances in Psychology Research
Publication Date:
1-Jan-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620276
Additional Links:
https://www.novapublishers.com
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a published work that appeared in final form in Advances in Psychology Research. To access the final edited and published work see https://www.novapublishers.com.
EISSN:
1532-723X
Appears in Collections:
Health and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Andrew E. P.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-08T13:57:42Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-08T13:57:42Z-
dc.date.issued2017-01-01-
dc.identifier.citationMitchell. A. E. P. (2017). The effect of a short course in cognitive and behavioural therapy (CBT) on knowledge acquisition in non-specialist CBT practitioners. Advances in Psychology Research, 120(1), 103-118.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620276-
dc.descriptionThis document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a published work that appeared in final form in Advances in Psychology Research. To access the final edited and published work see https://www.novapublishers.com.-
dc.description.abstractIn this study, we investigate the effects of training on knowledge acquisition in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). Knowledge acquisition is assessed through the Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Knowledge Questionnaire (CBT-KQ; Myles, Latham, Ricketts, 2002). The CBT-KQ contains 26 multiple-choice questions from five conceptual topics: general CBT issues, theoretical underpinnings of behavioural approaches, theoretical underpinnings of cognitive approaches, practice of behavioural therapy, and practice of cognitive therapy. Thirty eight students attended weekly 3 hour sessions and were tested at weeks 1 and 15 in a before and after study. Improvements in the CBT-KQ were modest but showed significant changes in three conceptual topics; general CBT issues, theoretical underpinnings of cognitive approaches and practice of cognitive therapy. These findings may have important implications for structuring CBT training, so that both the cognitive and behavioural components are shown in the knowledge acquisition and practice applications. Recent evidence suggests that the behavioural components of treatment for some conditions, such as depression, may be more important than the cognitive components. In addition, recent evidence indicates that the behavioural components might be more suitable for delivery by non-specialist CBT practitioners.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNova Science Publishersen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.novapublishers.comen
dc.subjectCognitive and Behavioural Therapyen
dc.subjectTrainingen
dc.titleThe effect of a short course in cognitive and behavioural therapy (CBT) on knowledge acquisition in non-specialist CBT practitionersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1532-723X-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalAdvances in Psychology Researchen
dc.date.accepted2016-09-29-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-01-01-
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