Drawing the answers: Sketching to support free and probed recall by child witnesses and victims with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620257
Title:
Drawing the answers: Sketching to support free and probed recall by child witnesses and victims with Autism Spectrum Disorder.
Authors:
Mattison, Michelle L. A.; Dando, Coral J.; Ormerod, Thomas C.
Abstract:
The success of witness interviews in the criminal justice system depends on the accuracy of information obtained, which is a function of both amount and quality of information. Attempts to enhance witness retrieval such as mental reinstatement of context have been designed with typically developed adults in mind. In this paper, the relative benefits of mental and sketch reinstatement mnemonics are explored with both typically developing children and children with autism. Children watched a crime event video, and their retrieval of event information was examined in free and probed recall phases of a cognitive interview. As expected, typically developing children recalled more correct information of all types than children with autism during free and probed recall phases. Sketching during free recall was more beneficial for both groups in both phases in reducing the amount of incorrect items, but the relative effect of sketching on enhancing retrieval accuracy was greater for children with autism. The results indicate the benefits of choosing retrieval mnemonics that are sensitive to the specific impairments of autistic individuals, and suggest that retrieval accuracy during interviews can be enhanced, in some cases to the same level as that of typically developing individuals.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Mattison, M. L. A., Dando, C. J., & Ormerod, T. (2016). Drawing the answers: Sketching to support free and probed recall by child witnesses and victims with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Autism: International Journal of Research and Practice.doi: 10.1177/1362361316669088
Publisher:
SAGE
Journal:
Autism: International Journal of Research and Practice.
Publication Date:
15-Nov-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620257
DOI:
10.1177/1362361316669088
Additional Links:
http://aut.sagepub.com/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
EISSN:
1461-7005
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMattison, Michelle L. A.en
dc.contributor.authorDando, Coral J.en
dc.contributor.authorOrmerod, Thomas C.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-23T18:09:49Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-23T18:09:49Z-
dc.date.issued2016-11-15-
dc.identifier.citationMattison, M. L. A., Dando, C. J., & Ormerod, T. (2016). Drawing the answers: Sketching to support free and probed recall by child witnesses and victims with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Autism: International Journal of Research and Practice.doi: 10.1177/1362361316669088en
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1362361316669088-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620257-
dc.description.abstractThe success of witness interviews in the criminal justice system depends on the accuracy of information obtained, which is a function of both amount and quality of information. Attempts to enhance witness retrieval such as mental reinstatement of context have been designed with typically developed adults in mind. In this paper, the relative benefits of mental and sketch reinstatement mnemonics are explored with both typically developing children and children with autism. Children watched a crime event video, and their retrieval of event information was examined in free and probed recall phases of a cognitive interview. As expected, typically developing children recalled more correct information of all types than children with autism during free and probed recall phases. Sketching during free recall was more beneficial for both groups in both phases in reducing the amount of incorrect items, but the relative effect of sketching on enhancing retrieval accuracy was greater for children with autism. The results indicate the benefits of choosing retrieval mnemonics that are sensitive to the specific impairments of autistic individuals, and suggest that retrieval accuracy during interviews can be enhanced, in some cases to the same level as that of typically developing individuals.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGEen
dc.relation.urlhttp://aut.sagepub.com/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectautismen
dc.subjectInterviewingen
dc.subjectDrawingen
dc.subjectwitnessen
dc.titleDrawing the answers: Sketching to support free and probed recall by child witnesses and victims with Autism Spectrum Disorder.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1461-7005-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalAutism: International Journal of Research and Practice.en
dc.date.accepted2016-08-22-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfunded researchen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-11-15-
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