Mind the Gaps: The rise and implications of cynicism within social work

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620223
Title:
Mind the Gaps: The rise and implications of cynicism within social work
Authors:
Carey, Malcolm
Abstract:
This paper explores the notable rise of cynicism among state social workers in Britain. Theoretically, cynicism has been viewed as ‘deviant emotion’ and pathology or as offering a type of employee resistance that may protect or support a person’s identity. Drawing upon case study research with practising social workers, the article looks at three different case examples of employee cynicism. These include the cynic as organisational survivor, disenfranchised sceptic or altruist. It was found that, although cynicism within social work predominately emerges as an emotional response to structural change, other factors such as those embodied within professional discourses and government or academic rhetoric can also impact. Other factors such as risk-averse assumptions that distance the practitioner from the ‘service user’ or colleagues can also have influence. Although often viewed negatively, cynicism can greatly benefit an organisation or motivate a practitioner to challenge normative principles and promote the needs of service users and carers.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Carey, M. (2014). Mind the Gaps: The rise and implications of cynicism within social work. British Journal of Social Work, 44 (1), pp. 127-144.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Journal:
British Journal of Social Work
Publication Date:
24-Aug-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620223
DOI:
10.1093/bjsw/bcs098
Additional Links:
http://bjsw.oxfordjournals.org/content/44/1/127
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is a pre-copy edited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in British Journal of Social Work following peer review. The version of record Carey, M. (2014). Mind the Gaps: The rise and implications of cynicism within social work. British Journal of Social Work, 44 (1), pp. 127-144 is available online at: http://bjsw.oxfordjournals.org/content/44/1/127
ISSN:
0045-3102
EISSN:
1468-263X
Appears in Collections:
Health and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCarey, Malcolmen
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-25T09:26:33Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-25T09:26:33Z-
dc.date.issued2012-08-24-
dc.identifier.citationCarey, M. (2014). Mind the Gaps: The rise and implications of cynicism within social work. British Journal of Social Work, 44 (1), pp. 127-144.en
dc.identifier.issn0045-3102-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/bjsw/bcs098-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620223-
dc.descriptionThis is a pre-copy edited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in British Journal of Social Work following peer review. The version of record Carey, M. (2014). Mind the Gaps: The rise and implications of cynicism within social work. British Journal of Social Work, 44 (1), pp. 127-144 is available online at: http://bjsw.oxfordjournals.org/content/44/1/127en
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores the notable rise of cynicism among state social workers in Britain. Theoretically, cynicism has been viewed as ‘deviant emotion’ and pathology or as offering a type of employee resistance that may protect or support a person’s identity. Drawing upon case study research with practising social workers, the article looks at three different case examples of employee cynicism. These include the cynic as organisational survivor, disenfranchised sceptic or altruist. It was found that, although cynicism within social work predominately emerges as an emotional response to structural change, other factors such as those embodied within professional discourses and government or academic rhetoric can also impact. Other factors such as risk-averse assumptions that distance the practitioner from the ‘service user’ or colleagues can also have influence. Although often viewed negatively, cynicism can greatly benefit an organisation or motivate a practitioner to challenge normative principles and promote the needs of service users and carers.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://bjsw.oxfordjournals.org/content/44/1/127en
dc.subjectCynicismen
dc.subjectRhetoricen
dc.titleMind the Gaps: The rise and implications of cynicism within social worken
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1468-263X-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Social Worken
dc.date.accepted2012-05-31-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2014-08-24-
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