Isn’t it good, Norwegian wood? Lifestyle and adventure sports participation among Norwegian youth

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620184
Title:
Isn’t it good, Norwegian wood? Lifestyle and adventure sports participation among Norwegian youth
Authors:
Green, Ken; Thurston, Miranda; Vaage, Odd
Abstract:
Based primarily on quantitative data from the Norwegian Statistisk Sentralbyrå (Statistics Norway) study of Mosjon, Friluftsliv og Kulturaktiviteter (Vaage, 2009) supplemented by a little qualitative data, this paper explores Norwegian youngsters’ (and, to a lesser extent, adults’) engagement with conventional and lifestyle sports via an examination of recent trends. Norway boasts particularly high levels of sports participation as well as sports club membership among young people and young Norwegians are the quintessential sporting omnivores. Nevertheless, among the age group where regular participation peaks in Norway (16-19-year-olds) the popularity of games declined over the decade 1997-2007 while participation in lifestyle sports continued to increase (Vaage, 2009). It seems that the particular mix of conventional and lifestyle sports that Norwegian youngsters favour has shifted within a generation, with lifestyle activities more prominent in 2007 than they had been even a decade earlier. The changes in participation in a particular area of sporting participation strongly associated with Norwegian culture – friluftsliv (outdoor life) – may well represent a shift among Norwegian youth towards sports and physical activities that offer alternative forms, as well as types, of participation to conventional sports. They may also represent alternative motivations to those traditionally associated with sport and, for that matter, friluftsliv. The paper draws upon these findings in order to tentatively hypothesize developments in youth leisure-sport in Norway.
Affiliation:
University of Chester; Hedmark University College; Norsk Statistisk Sentralbyra
Citation:
Green, K., Thurston, M., & Vaage, O. (2015). Isn’t it good, Norwegian wood? Lifestyle and adventure sports participation among Norwegian youth. Leisure Studies, 34(5), 529-46. DOI: 10.1080/02614367.2014.938771
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Leisure Studies
Publication Date:
19-Aug-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620184
DOI:
10.1080/02614367.2014.938771
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02614367.2014.938771
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Leisure Studies on 19/08/2014, available online: doi: 10.1080/02614367.2014.938771
EISSN:
1466-4496
Appears in Collections:
Sport and Exercise Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Kenen
dc.contributor.authorThurston, Mirandaen
dc.contributor.authorVaage, Odden
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-29T10:53:22Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-29T10:53:22Z-
dc.date.issued2014-08-19-
dc.identifier.citationGreen, K., Thurston, M., & Vaage, O. (2015). Isn’t it good, Norwegian wood? Lifestyle and adventure sports participation among Norwegian youth. Leisure Studies, 34(5), 529-46. DOI: 10.1080/02614367.2014.938771en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02614367.2014.938771-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620184-
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Leisure Studies on 19/08/2014, available online: doi: 10.1080/02614367.2014.938771en
dc.description.abstractBased primarily on quantitative data from the Norwegian Statistisk Sentralbyrå (Statistics Norway) study of Mosjon, Friluftsliv og Kulturaktiviteter (Vaage, 2009) supplemented by a little qualitative data, this paper explores Norwegian youngsters’ (and, to a lesser extent, adults’) engagement with conventional and lifestyle sports via an examination of recent trends. Norway boasts particularly high levels of sports participation as well as sports club membership among young people and young Norwegians are the quintessential sporting omnivores. Nevertheless, among the age group where regular participation peaks in Norway (16-19-year-olds) the popularity of games declined over the decade 1997-2007 while participation in lifestyle sports continued to increase (Vaage, 2009). It seems that the particular mix of conventional and lifestyle sports that Norwegian youngsters favour has shifted within a generation, with lifestyle activities more prominent in 2007 than they had been even a decade earlier. The changes in participation in a particular area of sporting participation strongly associated with Norwegian culture – friluftsliv (outdoor life) – may well represent a shift among Norwegian youth towards sports and physical activities that offer alternative forms, as well as types, of participation to conventional sports. They may also represent alternative motivations to those traditionally associated with sport and, for that matter, friluftsliv. The paper draws upon these findings in order to tentatively hypothesize developments in youth leisure-sport in Norway.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02614367.2014.938771en
dc.subjectLifestyle sportsen
dc.subjectFriluftsliven
dc.subjectYouthen
dc.subjectNorwayen
dc.titleIsn’t it good, Norwegian wood? Lifestyle and adventure sports participation among Norwegian youthen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1466-4496-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; Hedmark University College; Norsk Statistisk Sentralbyraen
dc.identifier.journalLeisure Studiesen
dc.date.accepted2014-06-04-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2014-08-19-
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