Girls, young women and sport in Norway: A case study of sporting convergence amid favourable socio-economic conditions

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620181
Title:
Girls, young women and sport in Norway: A case study of sporting convergence amid favourable socio-economic conditions
Authors:
Green, Ken; Thurston, Miranda; Vaage, Odd; Mordal-Moen, Kjersti
Abstract:
Based primarily on quantitative data from the Norwegian Statistisk Sentralbyrå (Statistics Norway) study of Mosjon, Friluftsliv og Kulturaktiviteter, this paper explores sports participation among females – and girls and young women, in particular – in Norway in the early years of the twenty-first century. In line with the observation that sport can be considered epiphenomenal, the paper argues that the comparatively high levels and marked increases in sports participation among young women are likely to have a great deal to do with their socio-economic status and, in particular, the diminishing gender gap over the past two decades. In short, the paper argues that trends in sports participation between 1997 and 2007 suggest that while young women in Norway may not be self-described feminists, they are heirs to the culture fostered by second-wave feminism: they have taken advantage of growing up in a country where standards of living are particularly high and at a time of greater equality between the sexes in order, among other things, to exploit the sporting opportunities increasingly available to them. In terms of the policy implications, the most salient lesson to be learned from the Norwegian situation – by countries keen to promote sports participation among girls and young women – is that instead of individually oriented approaches, sports policies need first and foremost to adopt society-level perspectives that address socio-economic gender disparities.
Affiliation:
University of Chester; Hedmark University
Citation:
Green, K., Thurston, M., Vaage, O., & Mordal-Moen, K. (2015). Girls, young women and sport in Norway: A case study of sporting convergence amid favourable socio-economic conditions. International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics, 7(4), 531-550. DOI: 10.1080/19406940.2015.1031812
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics
Publication Date:
14-Apr-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/620181
DOI:
10.1080/19406940.2015.1031812
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19406940.2015.1031812
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics on 14/04/2016, available online: doi: 10.1080/19406940.2015.1031812
ISSN:
1940 6940
Appears in Collections:
Sport and Exercise Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Kenen
dc.contributor.authorThurston, Mirandaen
dc.contributor.authorVaage, Odden
dc.contributor.authorMordal-Moen, Kjerstien
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-27T13:24:30Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-27T13:24:30Z-
dc.date.issued2015-04-14-
dc.identifier.citationGreen, K., Thurston, M., Vaage, O., & Mordal-Moen, K. (2015). Girls, young women and sport in Norway: A case study of sporting convergence amid favourable socio-economic conditions. International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics, 7(4), 531-550. DOI: 10.1080/19406940.2015.1031812en
dc.identifier.issn1940 6940-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/19406940.2015.1031812-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/620181-
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics on 14/04/2016, available online: doi: 10.1080/19406940.2015.1031812en
dc.description.abstractBased primarily on quantitative data from the Norwegian Statistisk Sentralbyrå (Statistics Norway) study of Mosjon, Friluftsliv og Kulturaktiviteter, this paper explores sports participation among females – and girls and young women, in particular – in Norway in the early years of the twenty-first century. In line with the observation that sport can be considered epiphenomenal, the paper argues that the comparatively high levels and marked increases in sports participation among young women are likely to have a great deal to do with their socio-economic status and, in particular, the diminishing gender gap over the past two decades. In short, the paper argues that trends in sports participation between 1997 and 2007 suggest that while young women in Norway may not be self-described feminists, they are heirs to the culture fostered by second-wave feminism: they have taken advantage of growing up in a country where standards of living are particularly high and at a time of greater equality between the sexes in order, among other things, to exploit the sporting opportunities increasingly available to them. In terms of the policy implications, the most salient lesson to be learned from the Norwegian situation – by countries keen to promote sports participation among girls and young women – is that instead of individually oriented approaches, sports policies need first and foremost to adopt society-level perspectives that address socio-economic gender disparities.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19406940.2015.1031812en
dc.subjectGenderen
dc.subjectNorwayen
dc.subjectPolicyen
dc.subjectParticipationen
dc.subjectSocio-economicen
dc.subjectSporten
dc.titleGirls, young women and sport in Norway: A case study of sporting convergence amid favourable socio-economic conditionsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester; Hedmark Universityen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Sport Policy and Politicsen
dc.date.accepted2015-01-14-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-10-14-
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