Monkey business, Marco Polo, and managing global public affairs and trade

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/618757
Title:
Monkey business, Marco Polo, and managing global public affairs and trade
Authors:
Harris, Phil
Abstract:
Editorial We are now in the year of the Monkey, a year of excitement and innovation. Monkey years are often dramatic and see large-scale political change, and if you believe these things, it is predicted that we may see much political change and the forging of new alliances. Given the instability, we are seeing in the Middle East and large parts of Africa. Suspect that this is not a predication but a good probability. It is also over 700 years since Marco Polo started traveling eastwards and commented on Chinese and Indian civilizations and observed and recorded the vast amount of trade that was evident in Asia and moved along the Silk Road. He remarked that a stable system of government made this all work for the benefit of each society and that war invariably led to human suffering and mass migration and destruction. Little has changed except that the size of the Asian economies has become larger and the impact of war and conflict more psychologically impactful because of modern media, but the devastation on human life as tragic as ever. This is a general issue and reflects the vibrancy and range of material and research in the public affairs area. Researchers and practitioners represent the EU, Europe, North America, and Asia. We still have gaps in our knowledge geographically, particularly in understanding public affairs in China, India, Japan, and Korea; there has only been limited work on. The first
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Harris, P. (2016). Monkey business, Marco Polo, and managing global public affairs and trade. Journal of Public Affairs, 16(1), 3-6. doi: 10.1002/pa.1608
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Journal of Public Affairs
Publication Date:
2-Feb-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/618757
DOI:
10.1002/pa.1608
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pa.v16.1/issuetoc
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Harris, P. (2016). Monkey business, Marco Polo, and managing global public affairs and trade. Journal of Public Affairs, 16(1), 3-6, which has been published in final form at doi: 10.1002/pa.1608. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
ISSN:
1479-1854
Appears in Collections:
Chester Business School

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Philen
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-24T13:52:51Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-24T13:52:51Z-
dc.date.issued2016-02-02-
dc.identifier.citationHarris, P. (2016). Monkey business, Marco Polo, and managing global public affairs and trade. Journal of Public Affairs, 16(1), 3-6. doi: 10.1002/pa.1608en
dc.identifier.issn1479-1854-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pa.1608-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/618757-
dc.descriptionThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Harris, P. (2016). Monkey business, Marco Polo, and managing global public affairs and trade. Journal of Public Affairs, 16(1), 3-6, which has been published in final form at doi: 10.1002/pa.1608. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.en
dc.description.abstractEditorial We are now in the year of the Monkey, a year of excitement and innovation. Monkey years are often dramatic and see large-scale political change, and if you believe these things, it is predicted that we may see much political change and the forging of new alliances. Given the instability, we are seeing in the Middle East and large parts of Africa. Suspect that this is not a predication but a good probability. It is also over 700 years since Marco Polo started traveling eastwards and commented on Chinese and Indian civilizations and observed and recorded the vast amount of trade that was evident in Asia and moved along the Silk Road. He remarked that a stable system of government made this all work for the benefit of each society and that war invariably led to human suffering and mass migration and destruction. Little has changed except that the size of the Asian economies has become larger and the impact of war and conflict more psychologically impactful because of modern media, but the devastation on human life as tragic as ever. This is a general issue and reflects the vibrancy and range of material and research in the public affairs area. Researchers and practitioners represent the EU, Europe, North America, and Asia. We still have gaps in our knowledge geographically, particularly in understanding public affairs in China, India, Japan, and Korea; there has only been limited work on. The firsten
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pa.v16.1/issuetocen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectpublic affairsen
dc.subjectlobbyingen
dc.subjectinternational businessen
dc.subjectMarketingen
dc.subjectChinaen
dc.subjectkoreaen
dc.subjectJapanen
dc.subjectCommunicationsen
dc.titleMonkey business, Marco Polo, and managing global public affairs and tradeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Public Affairsen
dc.date.accepted2016-02-01-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderunfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectunfundeden
rioxxterms.versionPen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-01-03-
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