Fieldwork and the practical implications for completing qualitative research in the British Armed Forces

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/618074
Title:
Fieldwork and the practical implications for completing qualitative research in the British Armed Forces
Authors:
Finnegan, Alan
Abstract:
This article provides direction regarding the practical implications of undertaking qualitative research within the British Army, and in particular the Defence Medical Services (DMS). Qualitative researchers must gather sufficient data to answer their research question, and guidance on using DMS healthcare professionals as the research sample is offered, including dealing with the 'gatekeepers' who control access, and the principles for creating a conducive environment to gather reliable data. Data collection is often through intensive interviewing where communication skills and personal awareness are vital to a successful study. Aids to a productive study include memo writing and listing factors that may later provide an insight into how the interviewees characterise and describe particular activities, events and groups. Guidance is offered to develop an interview schedule with questions related to each other in a seamless, meaningful way. Both the researcher's and participant's conscious and unconscious biases must be acknowledged. In this narrow and specialist field, DMS researchers need extensive knowledge of clinical practice and the military's distinctive language, characterised with nuances and abbreviations. These words portray meanings and perspectives that signpost the participants' view of their empirical world. Early identification, without having to seek clarification, means that the researcher can examine hidden assumptions in the sample's own language
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Finnegan, A. (2014). Fieldwork and the practical implications for completing qualitative research in the British Armed Forces. Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps, 160(2), 141-5. DOI: 10.1136/jramc-2013-000222
Publisher:
British Medical Journal
Journal:
Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
Publication Date:
9-Jan-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/618074
DOI:
10.1136/jramc-2013-000222
Additional Links:
http://jramc.bmj.com/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This document is appears in final form in Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps published by the British Medical Journal. To access the final edited and published work see http://jramc.bmj.com/.
EISSN:
2052-0468
Appears in Collections:
Health and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFinnegan, Alanen
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-08T16:20:50Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-08T16:20:50Z-
dc.date.issued2014-01-09-
dc.identifier.citationFinnegan, A. (2014). Fieldwork and the practical implications for completing qualitative research in the British Armed Forces. Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps, 160(2), 141-5. DOI: 10.1136/jramc-2013-000222en
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jramc-2013-000222-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/618074-
dc.descriptionThis document is appears in final form in Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps published by the British Medical Journal. To access the final edited and published work see http://jramc.bmj.com/.en
dc.description.abstractThis article provides direction regarding the practical implications of undertaking qualitative research within the British Army, and in particular the Defence Medical Services (DMS). Qualitative researchers must gather sufficient data to answer their research question, and guidance on using DMS healthcare professionals as the research sample is offered, including dealing with the 'gatekeepers' who control access, and the principles for creating a conducive environment to gather reliable data. Data collection is often through intensive interviewing where communication skills and personal awareness are vital to a successful study. Aids to a productive study include memo writing and listing factors that may later provide an insight into how the interviewees characterise and describe particular activities, events and groups. Guidance is offered to develop an interview schedule with questions related to each other in a seamless, meaningful way. Both the researcher's and participant's conscious and unconscious biases must be acknowledged. In this narrow and specialist field, DMS researchers need extensive knowledge of clinical practice and the military's distinctive language, characterised with nuances and abbreviations. These words portray meanings and perspectives that signpost the participants' view of their empirical world. Early identification, without having to seek clarification, means that the researcher can examine hidden assumptions in the sample's own languageen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBritish Medical Journalen
dc.relation.urlhttp://jramc.bmj.com/en
dc.subjectAuditen
dc.subjectQualitative Researchen
dc.titleFieldwork and the practical implications for completing qualitative research in the British Armed Forcesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2052-0468-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Royal Army Medical Corpsen
dc.date.accepted2013-01-01-
or.grant.openaccessYesen
rioxxterms.funderUnfundeden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUnfundeden
rioxxterms.versionAOen
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2216-01-09-
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